Perception, knowledge and attitude towards human papilloma virus infection and vaccination for cervical cancer prevention among university students

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Abstract

Introduction: Human papillomavirus (HPV) is a major factor for cervical cancer. However, routine HPV vaccination to combat the disease is not widely available in most developing countries, and the uptake is poor. Lack of knowledge or awareness may be a factor. This study assessed the perception, knowledge and attitude of university students toward HPV vaccination and cervical cancer prevention. Methods and Materials: A cross-sectional survey among 826 students using a validated questionnaire was conducted at Universiti Kebangsaan Malaysia. The convenience sampling technique was used to recruits study subjects. The knowledge score was categorised into poor (score ≤5), moderate (score 6-10) and good (score 11-15). Results: Sixty-eight percent were aware that persistent HPV infection can lead cervical cancer and 76% had heard about HPV vaccination to prevent cervical cancer. Female students were aware of the role of HPV vaccine against cervical cancer compared to their counterparts (41% vs. 28%, p<0.001). The pool mean total knowledge score was 8.03 (95% Confidence Interval [CI]; 7.83-8.24). Although only 12% of the students perceived themselves as at risk of HPV infection, only 55% had an intention to receive HPV vaccination. Of those who declined HPV vaccination, 36% worried about the side effects, and 28% doubted on its effectiveness. Female students had significantly higher acceptability towards HPV vaccine compared to male (39% vs. 16%, p=0.001). Intention to receive HPV vaccine was significantly correlated with the scores for awareness and knowledge of HPV vaccination, student's perception on their susceptibility and seriousness of HPV infection. Conclusion: The perception and knowledge of HPV infection and vaccination for cervical cancer prevention was unimpressive. This greatly will contribute to diminish acceptability for the vaccination.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)315-324
Number of pages10
JournalBrunei International Medical Journal
Volume9
Issue number5
Publication statusPublished - Oct 2013

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Papillomaviridae
Virus Diseases
Uterine Cervical Neoplasms
Vaccination
Students
Papillomavirus Infections
Papillomavirus Vaccines
Malaysia

Keywords

  • Cervical cancer
  • Human papilloma virus
  • Knowledge
  • Vaccination

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Medicine(all)

Cite this

@article{d278e6cece9a47b8a532574aba348496,
title = "Perception, knowledge and attitude towards human papilloma virus infection and vaccination for cervical cancer prevention among university students",
abstract = "Introduction: Human papillomavirus (HPV) is a major factor for cervical cancer. However, routine HPV vaccination to combat the disease is not widely available in most developing countries, and the uptake is poor. Lack of knowledge or awareness may be a factor. This study assessed the perception, knowledge and attitude of university students toward HPV vaccination and cervical cancer prevention. Methods and Materials: A cross-sectional survey among 826 students using a validated questionnaire was conducted at Universiti Kebangsaan Malaysia. The convenience sampling technique was used to recruits study subjects. The knowledge score was categorised into poor (score ≤5), moderate (score 6-10) and good (score 11-15). Results: Sixty-eight percent were aware that persistent HPV infection can lead cervical cancer and 76{\%} had heard about HPV vaccination to prevent cervical cancer. Female students were aware of the role of HPV vaccine against cervical cancer compared to their counterparts (41{\%} vs. 28{\%}, p<0.001). The pool mean total knowledge score was 8.03 (95{\%} Confidence Interval [CI]; 7.83-8.24). Although only 12{\%} of the students perceived themselves as at risk of HPV infection, only 55{\%} had an intention to receive HPV vaccination. Of those who declined HPV vaccination, 36{\%} worried about the side effects, and 28{\%} doubted on its effectiveness. Female students had significantly higher acceptability towards HPV vaccine compared to male (39{\%} vs. 16{\%}, p=0.001). Intention to receive HPV vaccine was significantly correlated with the scores for awareness and knowledge of HPV vaccination, student's perception on their susceptibility and seriousness of HPV infection. Conclusion: The perception and knowledge of HPV infection and vaccination for cervical cancer prevention was unimpressive. This greatly will contribute to diminish acceptability for the vaccination.",
keywords = "Cervical cancer, Human papilloma virus, Knowledge, Vaccination",
author = "Shafiee, {Mohamad Nasir} and {Kah Teik}, Chew and Kampan, {Nirmala @ Chandralega} and Lim, {Pei Shan} and Omar, {Mohd Hashim} and {Abdul Ghani}, {Nur Azurah} and {Mohd Dali}, {Ahmad Hatta}",
year = "2013",
month = "10",
language = "English",
volume = "9",
pages = "315--324",
journal = "Brunei International Medical Journal",
issn = "1560-5876",
publisher = "Ministry of Health and Universiti Brunei Darussalem",
number = "5",

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TY - JOUR

T1 - Perception, knowledge and attitude towards human papilloma virus infection and vaccination for cervical cancer prevention among university students

AU - Shafiee, Mohamad Nasir

AU - Kah Teik, Chew

AU - Kampan, Nirmala @ Chandralega

AU - Lim, Pei Shan

AU - Omar, Mohd Hashim

AU - Abdul Ghani, Nur Azurah

AU - Mohd Dali, Ahmad Hatta

PY - 2013/10

Y1 - 2013/10

N2 - Introduction: Human papillomavirus (HPV) is a major factor for cervical cancer. However, routine HPV vaccination to combat the disease is not widely available in most developing countries, and the uptake is poor. Lack of knowledge or awareness may be a factor. This study assessed the perception, knowledge and attitude of university students toward HPV vaccination and cervical cancer prevention. Methods and Materials: A cross-sectional survey among 826 students using a validated questionnaire was conducted at Universiti Kebangsaan Malaysia. The convenience sampling technique was used to recruits study subjects. The knowledge score was categorised into poor (score ≤5), moderate (score 6-10) and good (score 11-15). Results: Sixty-eight percent were aware that persistent HPV infection can lead cervical cancer and 76% had heard about HPV vaccination to prevent cervical cancer. Female students were aware of the role of HPV vaccine against cervical cancer compared to their counterparts (41% vs. 28%, p<0.001). The pool mean total knowledge score was 8.03 (95% Confidence Interval [CI]; 7.83-8.24). Although only 12% of the students perceived themselves as at risk of HPV infection, only 55% had an intention to receive HPV vaccination. Of those who declined HPV vaccination, 36% worried about the side effects, and 28% doubted on its effectiveness. Female students had significantly higher acceptability towards HPV vaccine compared to male (39% vs. 16%, p=0.001). Intention to receive HPV vaccine was significantly correlated with the scores for awareness and knowledge of HPV vaccination, student's perception on their susceptibility and seriousness of HPV infection. Conclusion: The perception and knowledge of HPV infection and vaccination for cervical cancer prevention was unimpressive. This greatly will contribute to diminish acceptability for the vaccination.

AB - Introduction: Human papillomavirus (HPV) is a major factor for cervical cancer. However, routine HPV vaccination to combat the disease is not widely available in most developing countries, and the uptake is poor. Lack of knowledge or awareness may be a factor. This study assessed the perception, knowledge and attitude of university students toward HPV vaccination and cervical cancer prevention. Methods and Materials: A cross-sectional survey among 826 students using a validated questionnaire was conducted at Universiti Kebangsaan Malaysia. The convenience sampling technique was used to recruits study subjects. The knowledge score was categorised into poor (score ≤5), moderate (score 6-10) and good (score 11-15). Results: Sixty-eight percent were aware that persistent HPV infection can lead cervical cancer and 76% had heard about HPV vaccination to prevent cervical cancer. Female students were aware of the role of HPV vaccine against cervical cancer compared to their counterparts (41% vs. 28%, p<0.001). The pool mean total knowledge score was 8.03 (95% Confidence Interval [CI]; 7.83-8.24). Although only 12% of the students perceived themselves as at risk of HPV infection, only 55% had an intention to receive HPV vaccination. Of those who declined HPV vaccination, 36% worried about the side effects, and 28% doubted on its effectiveness. Female students had significantly higher acceptability towards HPV vaccine compared to male (39% vs. 16%, p=0.001). Intention to receive HPV vaccine was significantly correlated with the scores for awareness and knowledge of HPV vaccination, student's perception on their susceptibility and seriousness of HPV infection. Conclusion: The perception and knowledge of HPV infection and vaccination for cervical cancer prevention was unimpressive. This greatly will contribute to diminish acceptability for the vaccination.

KW - Cervical cancer

KW - Human papilloma virus

KW - Knowledge

KW - Vaccination

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M3 - Article

VL - 9

SP - 315

EP - 324

JO - Brunei International Medical Journal

JF - Brunei International Medical Journal

SN - 1560-5876

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