Patterns of recognition of Arabic consonants by non-native children with cochlear implants and normal hearing

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Objective: This study examined the patterns of recognition of Arabic consonants, via information transmission analysis for phonological features, in a group of Malay children with normal hearing (NH) and cochlear implants (CI). Method: A total of 336 and 616 acoustic tokens were collected from six CI and 11 NH Malay children, respectively. The groups were matched for hearing age and duration of exposure to Arabic sounds. All the 28 Arabic consonants in the form of consonant–vowel /a/ were presented randomly twice via a loudspeaker at approximately 65 dB SPL. The participants were asked to repeat verbally the stimulus heard in each presentation. Results: Within the native Malay perceptual space, the two groups responded differently to the Arabic consonants. The dispersed uncategorized assimilation in the CI group was distinct in the confusion matrix (CM), as compared to the NH children. Consonants /ħ/, /tˁ/, /sˁ/ and /ʁ/ were difficult for the CI children, while the most accurate item was /k/ (84%). The CI group transmitted significantly reduced information, especially for place feature transmission, then the NH group (p < 0.001). Significant interactions between place-hearing status and manner-hearing status were also obtained, suggesting there were information transmission differences in the pattern of consonants recognition between the study groups. Conclusion: CI and NH Malay children may be using different acoustic cues to recognize Arabic sounds, which contribute to the different assimilation categories’ patterns within the Malay perceptual space.

Original languageEnglish
JournalCochlear Implants International
DOIs
Publication statusAccepted/In press - 1 Jan 2018

Fingerprint

Cochlear Implants
Hearing
Acoustics
Confusion
Cues
Research Design

Keywords

  • Arabic consonants
  • Cochlear implant
  • Dispersed uncategorized assimilation
  • Information transmission analysis
  • Non-native children
  • Perceptual space
  • Phonological features

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Otorhinolaryngology
  • Speech and Hearing

Cite this

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title = "Patterns of recognition of Arabic consonants by non-native children with cochlear implants and normal hearing",
abstract = "Objective: This study examined the patterns of recognition of Arabic consonants, via information transmission analysis for phonological features, in a group of Malay children with normal hearing (NH) and cochlear implants (CI). Method: A total of 336 and 616 acoustic tokens were collected from six CI and 11 NH Malay children, respectively. The groups were matched for hearing age and duration of exposure to Arabic sounds. All the 28 Arabic consonants in the form of consonant–vowel /a/ were presented randomly twice via a loudspeaker at approximately 65 dB SPL. The participants were asked to repeat verbally the stimulus heard in each presentation. Results: Within the native Malay perceptual space, the two groups responded differently to the Arabic consonants. The dispersed uncategorized assimilation in the CI group was distinct in the confusion matrix (CM), as compared to the NH children. Consonants /ħ/, /tˁ/, /sˁ/ and /ʁ/ were difficult for the CI children, while the most accurate item was /k/ (84{\%}). The CI group transmitted significantly reduced information, especially for place feature transmission, then the NH group (p < 0.001). Significant interactions between place-hearing status and manner-hearing status were also obtained, suggesting there were information transmission differences in the pattern of consonants recognition between the study groups. Conclusion: CI and NH Malay children may be using different acoustic cues to recognize Arabic sounds, which contribute to the different assimilation categories’ patterns within the Malay perceptual space.",
keywords = "Arabic consonants, Cochlear implant, Dispersed uncategorized assimilation, Information transmission analysis, Non-native children, Perceptual space, Phonological features",
author = "Anis, {Farheen Naz} and Cila Umat and Kartini Ahmad and {Abdul Hamid}, Badrulzaman",
year = "2018",
month = "1",
day = "1",
doi = "10.1080/14670100.2018.1530420",
language = "English",
journal = "Cochlear Implants International",
issn = "1467-0100",
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T1 - Patterns of recognition of Arabic consonants by non-native children with cochlear implants and normal hearing

AU - Anis, Farheen Naz

AU - Umat, Cila

AU - Ahmad, Kartini

AU - Abdul Hamid, Badrulzaman

PY - 2018/1/1

Y1 - 2018/1/1

N2 - Objective: This study examined the patterns of recognition of Arabic consonants, via information transmission analysis for phonological features, in a group of Malay children with normal hearing (NH) and cochlear implants (CI). Method: A total of 336 and 616 acoustic tokens were collected from six CI and 11 NH Malay children, respectively. The groups were matched for hearing age and duration of exposure to Arabic sounds. All the 28 Arabic consonants in the form of consonant–vowel /a/ were presented randomly twice via a loudspeaker at approximately 65 dB SPL. The participants were asked to repeat verbally the stimulus heard in each presentation. Results: Within the native Malay perceptual space, the two groups responded differently to the Arabic consonants. The dispersed uncategorized assimilation in the CI group was distinct in the confusion matrix (CM), as compared to the NH children. Consonants /ħ/, /tˁ/, /sˁ/ and /ʁ/ were difficult for the CI children, while the most accurate item was /k/ (84%). The CI group transmitted significantly reduced information, especially for place feature transmission, then the NH group (p < 0.001). Significant interactions between place-hearing status and manner-hearing status were also obtained, suggesting there were information transmission differences in the pattern of consonants recognition between the study groups. Conclusion: CI and NH Malay children may be using different acoustic cues to recognize Arabic sounds, which contribute to the different assimilation categories’ patterns within the Malay perceptual space.

AB - Objective: This study examined the patterns of recognition of Arabic consonants, via information transmission analysis for phonological features, in a group of Malay children with normal hearing (NH) and cochlear implants (CI). Method: A total of 336 and 616 acoustic tokens were collected from six CI and 11 NH Malay children, respectively. The groups were matched for hearing age and duration of exposure to Arabic sounds. All the 28 Arabic consonants in the form of consonant–vowel /a/ were presented randomly twice via a loudspeaker at approximately 65 dB SPL. The participants were asked to repeat verbally the stimulus heard in each presentation. Results: Within the native Malay perceptual space, the two groups responded differently to the Arabic consonants. The dispersed uncategorized assimilation in the CI group was distinct in the confusion matrix (CM), as compared to the NH children. Consonants /ħ/, /tˁ/, /sˁ/ and /ʁ/ were difficult for the CI children, while the most accurate item was /k/ (84%). The CI group transmitted significantly reduced information, especially for place feature transmission, then the NH group (p < 0.001). Significant interactions between place-hearing status and manner-hearing status were also obtained, suggesting there were information transmission differences in the pattern of consonants recognition between the study groups. Conclusion: CI and NH Malay children may be using different acoustic cues to recognize Arabic sounds, which contribute to the different assimilation categories’ patterns within the Malay perceptual space.

KW - Arabic consonants

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