Patients with acute myocardial infarction and unstable angina have significant levels of anteceding stress

A. J. Michael, Saroja Krishnaswamy, F. Badri-Alyeope, K. Yusoff, T. S. Muthusamy, Jamaludin Mohamed

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Objective: There is a significant correlation between stress and coronary artery disease when the stress is continuous and extreme. This study aims to determine the relationship between stress-related psychosocial factors, namely anxiety, depression, and life events, with ischaemic heart disease. Patients and Methods: Two sets of questionnaires - The Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale and Rahe's Life Changes Stress Test - were administered to 3 groups comprising 36 patients with acute myocardial infarction or unstable angina, 38 outpatients from the Cardiology Clinic at the Universiti Kebangsaan Malaysia, and 25 healthy people from the community. All participants rated their feelings and reported any major lifestyle changes in the 6 months prior to interview. Results: The study group had significantly higher odds of having had mild anxiety and depression and moderate-risk life events when compared to the healthy participants. There was no significant difference between the case group and the outpatients. Conclusions: Psychosocial factors relating to stress is present in patients with acute ischaemic heart disease. Outpatients who have had long-term cardiac tribulation have the same odds for anxiety, depression, and life events as the patients with acute myocardial infarction.

Original languageEnglish
JournalHong Kong Journal of Psychiatry
Volume14
Issue number1
Publication statusPublished - Mar 2004

Fingerprint

Unstable Angina
Anxiety
Myocardial Infarction
Depression
Myocardial Ischemia
Outpatients
Psychology
Malaysia
Ambulatory Care Facilities
Cardiology
Exercise Test
Psychological Stress
Life Style
Coronary Artery Disease
Healthy Volunteers
Emotions
Interviews

Keywords

  • Anxiety
  • Depression
  • Myocardial infarction
  • Psychological stress
  • Unstable angina

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Psychiatry and Mental health

Cite this

Patients with acute myocardial infarction and unstable angina have significant levels of anteceding stress. / Michael, A. J.; Krishnaswamy, Saroja; Badri-Alyeope, F.; Yusoff, K.; Muthusamy, T. S.; Mohamed, Jamaludin.

In: Hong Kong Journal of Psychiatry, Vol. 14, No. 1, 03.2004.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Michael, AJ, Krishnaswamy, S, Badri-Alyeope, F, Yusoff, K, Muthusamy, TS & Mohamed, J 2004, 'Patients with acute myocardial infarction and unstable angina have significant levels of anteceding stress', Hong Kong Journal of Psychiatry, vol. 14, no. 1.
Michael, A. J. ; Krishnaswamy, Saroja ; Badri-Alyeope, F. ; Yusoff, K. ; Muthusamy, T. S. ; Mohamed, Jamaludin. / Patients with acute myocardial infarction and unstable angina have significant levels of anteceding stress. In: Hong Kong Journal of Psychiatry. 2004 ; Vol. 14, No. 1.
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