Patient-centred care in the context of pharmacy consultations: A qualitative study with patients and pharmacists in Malaysia

Yew Keong Ng, Noraida Mohamed Shah, Ly Sia Loong, Lay Ting Pee, Wei Wen Chong

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Rationale, aims and objectives: Patient-centred care (PCC) has been increasingly recognized as the standard in current health care, especially when it comes to health communication between patients and health care professionals. The evidence suggests that PCC could potentially improve medication-related outcomes such as medication adherence, disease self-management, and patient-provider relationships. Pharmacists are strategically positioned in the health care system to provide medication management to patients. However, there is a paucity of research regarding PCC in pharmacist-patient consultations. This study aimed to explore the views and experiences of pharmacists and patients on the important aspects of a PCC consultation. Methods: A semistructured interview study was conducted among 17 patients and 18 pharmacists in three tertiary hospitals in Malaysia. All interviews were audiotaped and transcribed verbatim. Themes were developed using a constant comparison approach and thematic analysis. Results: Five main themes emerged from the data, namely, achieving mutual understanding, recognizing individuality, communication style, information giving, and medication decision making. For both pharmacists and patients, a PCC consultation should promote mutual understanding and non-judgmental discussions. Communication was an important element to bridge the gap between patients' and pharmacists' expectations. Patients emphasized the importance of emotional aspects of the consultation, while pharmacists emphasized the importance of evidence-based information to support patient engagement and information needs. Conclusions: Comparison of pharmacists' and patients' views provided insight towards important aspects of PCC in pharmacist-patient consultations. It was suggested that PCC is not a one-sided approach but rather a patient-provider collaboration to optimize the consultation. Further research can be done to improve the integration of PCC in the local health care context, including pharmacist consultations.

Original languageEnglish
JournalJournal of Evaluation in Clinical Practice
DOIs
Publication statusAccepted/In press - 1 Jan 2020

Fingerprint

Patient-Centered Care
Malaysia
Pharmacists
Referral and Consultation
Delivery of Health Care
Communication
Interviews
Health Communication
Patient Participation
Medication Adherence
Self Care
Disease Management
Research
Tertiary Care Centers
Individuality
Decision Making
Patient Care

Keywords

  • concordance
  • health care partnership
  • patient involvement
  • person-centred care

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Health Policy
  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health

Cite this

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title = "Patient-centred care in the context of pharmacy consultations: A qualitative study with patients and pharmacists in Malaysia",
abstract = "Rationale, aims and objectives: Patient-centred care (PCC) has been increasingly recognized as the standard in current health care, especially when it comes to health communication between patients and health care professionals. The evidence suggests that PCC could potentially improve medication-related outcomes such as medication adherence, disease self-management, and patient-provider relationships. Pharmacists are strategically positioned in the health care system to provide medication management to patients. However, there is a paucity of research regarding PCC in pharmacist-patient consultations. This study aimed to explore the views and experiences of pharmacists and patients on the important aspects of a PCC consultation. Methods: A semistructured interview study was conducted among 17 patients and 18 pharmacists in three tertiary hospitals in Malaysia. All interviews were audiotaped and transcribed verbatim. Themes were developed using a constant comparison approach and thematic analysis. Results: Five main themes emerged from the data, namely, achieving mutual understanding, recognizing individuality, communication style, information giving, and medication decision making. For both pharmacists and patients, a PCC consultation should promote mutual understanding and non-judgmental discussions. Communication was an important element to bridge the gap between patients' and pharmacists' expectations. Patients emphasized the importance of emotional aspects of the consultation, while pharmacists emphasized the importance of evidence-based information to support patient engagement and information needs. Conclusions: Comparison of pharmacists' and patients' views provided insight towards important aspects of PCC in pharmacist-patient consultations. It was suggested that PCC is not a one-sided approach but rather a patient-provider collaboration to optimize the consultation. Further research can be done to improve the integration of PCC in the local health care context, including pharmacist consultations.",
keywords = "concordance, health care partnership, patient involvement, person-centred care",
author = "Ng, {Yew Keong} and Shah, {Noraida Mohamed} and Loong, {Ly Sia} and Pee, {Lay Ting} and Chong, {Wei Wen}",
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AU - Pee, Lay Ting

AU - Chong, Wei Wen

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