Pathogenesis of alcohol-induced osteoporosis and its treatment

A review

Seham S. Abukhadir, Norazlina Mohamed, Norliza Mohamed

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

12 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Osteoporosis is the most common bone disease in humans; it represents a major public health problem. This chronic disease is characterized by increase in bone fracture due to: reduced bone mass, deterioration of micro architectural and decreased bone strength, bone fragility; and bone mineral density 2.5 or more standard deviations below the normal mean. Secondary osteoporosis is a common cause of osteoporosis, and there are many underlying risk factors for osteoporosis. Chronic alcohol abuse is one of the modifiable risk factors in osteoporosis. There is evidence of correlation between chronic alcohol abuse and low bone mass. Alcohol is directly toxic to the bone; with increased incidence of fractures and complications. Although there is a paucity of studies regarding alcohol induced osteoporosis therapy, it can be classified into antiresorptive therapy and anabolic therapy. Bisphosphonates have been demonstrated to be clinically relevant to prevent bone damage associated with alcohol use while parathyroid hormone increased bone mineralization as well as bone formation in alcohol treated rats. Vitamin D supplementation could prevent bone toxicity in chronic drinkers. This review discussed the pathogenesis of alcohol-induced osteoporosis and the agents available for its treatment. Other potential therapies are also discussed.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)1601-1610
Number of pages10
JournalCurrent Drug Targets
Volume14
Issue number13
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Dec 2013

Fingerprint

Osteoporosis
Bone
Alcohols
Bone and Bones
Alcoholism
Physiologic Calcification
Poisons
Bone Diseases
Bone Fractures
Diphosphonates
Therapeutics
Parathyroid Hormone
Osteogenesis
Vitamin D
Bone Density
Chronic Disease
Public Health
Public health
Medical problems
Incidence

Keywords

  • Alcohol-induced
  • Bone mineral density
  • Oxidative stress
  • Secondary osteoporosis

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Drug Discovery
  • Pharmacology
  • Clinical Biochemistry
  • Molecular Medicine

Cite this

Pathogenesis of alcohol-induced osteoporosis and its treatment : A review. / Abukhadir, Seham S.; Mohamed, Norazlina; Mohamed, Norliza.

In: Current Drug Targets, Vol. 14, No. 13, 12.2013, p. 1601-1610.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abukhadir, Seham S. ; Mohamed, Norazlina ; Mohamed, Norliza. / Pathogenesis of alcohol-induced osteoporosis and its treatment : A review. In: Current Drug Targets. 2013 ; Vol. 14, No. 13. pp. 1601-1610.
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