Partitioning of heavy metals on soil samples from column tests

R. N. Yong, Wan Zuhairi Wan Yaacob, S. P. Bentley, C. Harris, B. K. Tan

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

33 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

In this study, column tests were used to determine the retention capability of three types of estuarine alluvia collected adjacent to landfill sites in South Wales. Selective sequential extraction (SSE) was used to study the retention mechanisms of heavy metals in the soil columns obtained from leaching experiments. Acid digestion was later used to check the validity of the SSE results. Breakthrough curves show good retention of heavy metal ions (Pb, Cu, and Zn) by all soils, where almost 99% of heavy metals were retained with the Ce/Co values in the order of 10-3. The retention strength of these soils was observed to be constant up to five pore volumes (PV). This corresponds with the pH of the effluents and pore water of soil slices, which also show good buffering capacity against very acidic leachate up to 5PV. The heavy metal extraction profiles from SSE show very similar trends with the retention profiles from the leaching experiments, where heavy metals were retained mainly at the top part where the leachate entered the column. SSE indicates qualitatively that heavy metals precipitated with carbonates and amorphous materials (oxides/hydroxides) are higher than heavy metal retention via exchangeable mechanisms. The mass balance calculation gives range of deviation of 1-16% of the total soil extraction. The distribution of the heavy metals with various soil constituents are ranked in the following order: Carbonates > Amorphous oxides hydroxides > Organic matter > Exchangeable phases.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)307-322
Number of pages16
JournalEngineering Geology
Volume60
Issue number1-4
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Jun 2001
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Heavy metals
partitioning
heavy metal
Soils
soil
Leaching
hydroxide
leachate
Carbonates
leaching
oxide
carbonate
acid digestion
Oxides
test
breakthrough curve
soil column
Land fill
buffering
Heavy ions

Keywords

  • Acide digestion
  • Breakthrough curves
  • Buffering capacity
  • Clay barrier
  • Column tests
  • pH
  • Pore water
  • Precipitation
  • Retention migration
  • Selective sequential extraction

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Geotechnical Engineering and Engineering Geology

Cite this

Partitioning of heavy metals on soil samples from column tests. / Yong, R. N.; Wan Yaacob, Wan Zuhairi; Bentley, S. P.; Harris, C.; Tan, B. K.

In: Engineering Geology, Vol. 60, No. 1-4, 06.2001, p. 307-322.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Yong, R. N. ; Wan Yaacob, Wan Zuhairi ; Bentley, S. P. ; Harris, C. ; Tan, B. K. / Partitioning of heavy metals on soil samples from column tests. In: Engineering Geology. 2001 ; Vol. 60, No. 1-4. pp. 307-322.
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