Participation of indigenous malaysians in commerce and industry

Challenges and aspirations in anticipation of the year 2000

Zhahir Kechot, Noor Aini Khalifah

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

Abstract

The phenomenon of economic specialization of Malaysians along racial lines was probably the most important colonial legacy that was left behind by the British when the country attained its independence in 1957. At the time of independence, the indigenous Malay people, collectively termed as bumiputeras, were engaged in the declining or at best stagnant peasant sector, while the non-indigenous communities were engaged in the buoyant plantation and mining sectors, as well as in commerce and industry. The imbalance obvious in this arrangement tended to be self-perpetuating and cumulative because the Malays had low income and low capacity to accumulate capital to invest in their education or to move to urban areas, where the growth industries were located.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)213-236
Number of pages24
JournalHumanomics
Volume15
Issue number2
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 1 Feb 1999

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Commerce
Aspiration
Anticipation
Industry
Participation
Imbalance
Low income
Plantation
OR education
Economics
Indigenous peoples
Urban areas
Peasants
Education
Income
Colonies
Arrangement
Urban Areas

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Philosophy
  • Economics and Econometrics

Cite this

Participation of indigenous malaysians in commerce and industry : Challenges and aspirations in anticipation of the year 2000. / Kechot, Zhahir; Khalifah, Noor Aini.

In: Humanomics, Vol. 15, No. 2, 01.02.1999, p. 213-236.

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

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