Parental knowledge, attitudes and antibiotic use for acute upper respiratory tract infection in children attending a primary healthcare clinic in Malaysia

Giin Cherng Chan, Swee Fong Tang

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

57 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Introduction: A study was carried out in a primary Healthcare clinic in the Hulu Langat district of Malaysia to assess the parental knowledge, attitudes and antibiotic use for common childhood acute upper respiratory tract infection (URTI). Methods: A cross-sectional study involving 421 parents, who were surveyed by using an interviewer-administered questionnaire, from April to June 2001. Results: Approximately 59 percent of parents from this study believed that weather was the main cause of acute URTI of their children, 13 percent thought it was due to food, and only about 27 percent said it was caused by germs. Nearly 68 percent, 69 percent and 76 percent of them believed that antibiotics was helpful in treating the common cold, cough and fever, respectively. 29 percent of parents who thought that their child with acute URTI needed antibiotics were not prescribed with any. On the other hand, 17 percent believed that antibiotics were unnecessary when prescribed. 28 percent of parents had requested for antibiotics, and 93 percent received what they requested for their child with acute URTI. About 31 percent of parents who did not request any antibiotics claimed that private general practitioners habitually prescribed antibiotics. The antibiotic compliance was poor with only 74 percent completing the entire course, with 85 percent of them stopping once they improved symptomatically. 15 percent of parents gave "leftover" antibiotics, 24 percent gave "shared" antibiotics, and 5.5 percent bought antibiotics for their child with acute URTI without consulting a doctor. Conclusion: This study shows that parents often have inadequate knowledge and misconceptions on antibiotic use for acute URTI in children. Improved parental education may reduce unnecessary antibiotic prescription and antimicrobial resistance in the community.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)266-270
Number of pages5
JournalSingapore Medical Journal
Volume47
Issue number4
Publication statusPublished - Apr 2006

Fingerprint

Malaysia
Respiratory Tract Infections
Primary Health Care
Anti-Bacterial Agents
Parents
Common Cold
Weather
Cough
General Practitioners
Compliance
Prescriptions
Fever
Cross-Sectional Studies

Keywords

  • Antibiotics
  • Children
  • Parental attitute
  • Parental knowledge
  • Upper respiratory tract infections

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Medicine(all)

Cite this

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abstract = "Introduction: A study was carried out in a primary Healthcare clinic in the Hulu Langat district of Malaysia to assess the parental knowledge, attitudes and antibiotic use for common childhood acute upper respiratory tract infection (URTI). Methods: A cross-sectional study involving 421 parents, who were surveyed by using an interviewer-administered questionnaire, from April to June 2001. Results: Approximately 59 percent of parents from this study believed that weather was the main cause of acute URTI of their children, 13 percent thought it was due to food, and only about 27 percent said it was caused by germs. Nearly 68 percent, 69 percent and 76 percent of them believed that antibiotics was helpful in treating the common cold, cough and fever, respectively. 29 percent of parents who thought that their child with acute URTI needed antibiotics were not prescribed with any. On the other hand, 17 percent believed that antibiotics were unnecessary when prescribed. 28 percent of parents had requested for antibiotics, and 93 percent received what they requested for their child with acute URTI. About 31 percent of parents who did not request any antibiotics claimed that private general practitioners habitually prescribed antibiotics. The antibiotic compliance was poor with only 74 percent completing the entire course, with 85 percent of them stopping once they improved symptomatically. 15 percent of parents gave {"}leftover{"} antibiotics, 24 percent gave {"}shared{"} antibiotics, and 5.5 percent bought antibiotics for their child with acute URTI without consulting a doctor. Conclusion: This study shows that parents often have inadequate knowledge and misconceptions on antibiotic use for acute URTI in children. Improved parental education may reduce unnecessary antibiotic prescription and antimicrobial resistance in the community.",
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