Parasitism performance and fitness of Cotesia vestalis (Hymenoptera

Braconidae) infected with Nosema sp. (Microsporidia: Nosematidae): Implications in integrated pest management strategy

Nadia Kermani, Zainal Abidin Abu Hassan, Amalina Suhaimi, Ismail Abuzid, Noor Farehan Ismail, Mansour Attia, Idris Abd. Ghani

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

2 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The diamondback moth (DBM) Plutella xylostella (L.) has traditionally been managed using synthetic insecticides. However, the increasing resistance of DBM to insecticides offers an impetus to practice integrated pest management (IPM) strategies by exploiting its natural enemies such as pathogens, parasitoids, and predators. Nevertheless, the interactions between pathogens and parasitoids and/or predators might affect the effectiveness of the parasitoids in regulating the host population. Thus, the parasitism rate of Nosema-infected DBM by Cotesia vestalis (Haliday) (Hym., Braconidae) can be negatively influenced by such interactions. In this study, we investigated the effects of Nosema infection in DBM on the parasitism performance of C. vestalis. The results of no-choice test showed that C. vestalis had a higher parasitism rate on non-infected host larvae than on Nosema-treated host larvae. The C. vestalis individuals that emerged from Nosema-infected DBM (F1) and their progeny (F2) had smaller pupae, a decreased rate of emergence, lowered fecundity, and a prolonged development period compared to those of the control group. DBM infection by Nosema sp. also negatively affected the morphometrics of C. vestalis. The eggs of female C. vestalis that developed in Nosema-infected DBM were larger than those of females that developed in non-infected DBM. These detrimental effects on the F1 and F2 generations of C. vestalis might severely impact the effectiveness of combining pathogens and parasitoids as parts of an IPM strategy for DBM control.

Original languageEnglish
Article numbere100671
JournalPLoS One
Volume9
Issue number6
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 26 Jun 2014

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Nosema
Microsporidia
Cotesia
Pest Control
Hymenoptera
Moths
Plutella xylostella
Pathogens
Braconidae
integrated pest management
parasitism
Insecticides
parasitoids
Larva
pathogens
insecticides
Pupa
predators
larvae
Infection

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Agricultural and Biological Sciences(all)
  • Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology(all)
  • Medicine(all)

Cite this

Parasitism performance and fitness of Cotesia vestalis (Hymenoptera : Braconidae) infected with Nosema sp. (Microsporidia: Nosematidae): Implications in integrated pest management strategy. / Kermani, Nadia; Abu Hassan, Zainal Abidin; Suhaimi, Amalina; Abuzid, Ismail; Ismail, Noor Farehan; Attia, Mansour; Abd. Ghani, Idris.

In: PLoS One, Vol. 9, No. 6, e100671, 26.06.2014.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Kermani, Nadia ; Abu Hassan, Zainal Abidin ; Suhaimi, Amalina ; Abuzid, Ismail ; Ismail, Noor Farehan ; Attia, Mansour ; Abd. Ghani, Idris. / Parasitism performance and fitness of Cotesia vestalis (Hymenoptera : Braconidae) infected with Nosema sp. (Microsporidia: Nosematidae): Implications in integrated pest management strategy. In: PLoS One. 2014 ; Vol. 9, No. 6.
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