Paper review of factors, surveillance and burden of food borne disease outbreak in Malaysia

Sharifa Ezat Wan Puteh, D. Netty, G. Sangaran

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

12 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Food borne diseases like cholera, typhoid fever, hepatitis A, dysentery and food poisoning occur as the results of ingestion of foodstuffs contaminated with microorganisms or chemical. The true incidence of food borne disease in Malaysia is unknown, however the incidence is low ranging from 1.56 to 0.14 cases per 100,000 population and the food poisoning cases is on the rise as the evident by the incident rate of 62.47 cases per 100,000 population in 2008 and 36.17 in 2009. The rapid population growth and demographic shift toward ageing population, changing eating habit such as consumption of raw or lightly cooked food, long storage of such food, lack of education on basic rules of hygienic food preparation and food trading without appropriate microbiological safety procedure become contributing factors for food borne diseases. Food borne disease in Malaysia is in the rise and the direct and indirect cost management of FBD will become one of the most common issues to face by the government. The world is spending millions and millions in cost of treatment due to food borne diseases. The information on this paper was collected via findings of previous journals, data and statistics from the MOH of Malaysia and WHO websites. As a result, authors found that the prevention and management of the food borne disease outbreak needs to be addressed seriously.

Original languageEnglish
JournalMalaysian Journal of Public Health Medicine
Volume13
Issue number2
Publication statusPublished - 2013

Fingerprint

Foodborne Diseases
Malaysia
Disease Outbreaks
Food
Food Storage
Population
Dysentery
Hepatitis A
Cholera
Typhoid Fever
Population Growth
Incidence
Feeding Behavior
Health Care Costs
Eating
Demography
Safety
Education
Costs and Cost Analysis

Keywords

  • Contaminated
  • Cost
  • Food borne diseases
  • Malaysia
  • Outbreak

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health

Cite this

Paper review of factors, surveillance and burden of food borne disease outbreak in Malaysia. / Wan Puteh, Sharifa Ezat; Netty, D.; Sangaran, G.

In: Malaysian Journal of Public Health Medicine, Vol. 13, No. 2, 2013.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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