Paleomagnetism of Peninsular Malaysia

B. Richter, E. Schmidtke, M. Fuller, N. Harbury, Abdul Rahim Samsudin

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

31 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Paleomagnetic results from Upper Jurassic to Paleocene rocks in Peninsular Malaysia show counter clockwise (CCW) rotations, while clockwise rotations (CW) are predominantly found in older rocks. Continental redbeds of the Upper Jurassic to Lower Cretaceous Tembeling Group have a post folding remagnetization, giving a VGP at N54°E29°, corresponding to approximately 40°of CCW rotation relative to Eurasia and 60°CCW relative to the Indochina block (Khorat Plateau). Samples from Cretaceous to Paleocene mafic volcanics of the Kuantan dike swarm and the Segamat basalts give VGPs at N59°E47°and N34°E36°, respectively. These Malayasian data are indistinguishable from the Late Eocene and Oligocene VGPs reported for Borneo and the Celebes Sea and are similar to the Eocene VGPs reported for southwest Sulawesi and southwest Palawan. The occurrence of CCW deflected data over this large region suggests that much of Malaysia, Borneo, Sulawesi, and the Celebes Sea rotated approximately 30°to 40°CCW relative to the Geocentric Axial Dipole (GAD) between the Late Eocene and the Late Miocene, although not necessarily synchronously, nor as a single rigid plate. These regional CCW rotations are not consistent with simple extrusion based tectonic models. CW declinations have been measured in Late Triassic granites, Permian to Triassic volcanics, and remagnetized Paleozoic carbonates. The age of this magnetization is poorly understood and may be as old as Late Triassic, or as young as Middle or Late Cretaceous. The plate, or block rotations, giving rise to these directions are correspondingly weakly constrained.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)477-519
Number of pages43
JournalJournal of Asian Earth Sciences
Volume17
Issue number4
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Aug 1999

Fingerprint

paleomagnetism
Eocene
Triassic
Cretaceous
Paleocene
Jurassic
block rotation
remagnetization
dike swarm
extrusion
magnetization
rock
folding
Oligocene
Permian
Paleozoic
basalt
Miocene
plateau
carbonate

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Earth-Surface Processes
  • Geology

Cite this

Paleomagnetism of Peninsular Malaysia. / Richter, B.; Schmidtke, E.; Fuller, M.; Harbury, N.; Samsudin, Abdul Rahim.

In: Journal of Asian Earth Sciences, Vol. 17, No. 4, 08.1999, p. 477-519.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Richter, B, Schmidtke, E, Fuller, M, Harbury, N & Samsudin, AR 1999, 'Paleomagnetism of Peninsular Malaysia', Journal of Asian Earth Sciences, vol. 17, no. 4, pp. 477-519. https://doi.org/10.1016/S1367-9120(99)00006-1
Richter, B. ; Schmidtke, E. ; Fuller, M. ; Harbury, N. ; Samsudin, Abdul Rahim. / Paleomagnetism of Peninsular Malaysia. In: Journal of Asian Earth Sciences. 1999 ; Vol. 17, No. 4. pp. 477-519.
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