Paediatric cholesteatoma

Experience of universiti kebangsaan malaysia medical centre

Bee See Goh, Jian Woei Teoh, Rahim Faizah, Saim Lokman, Asma Abdullah

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Introduction: Cholesteatoma is an aggressive disease and its management poses a greater challenge in children than in adults. This study reviews the experience of Universiti Kebangsaan Malaysia Medical Centre in the clinical presentation and management outcome of acquired cholesteatoma in paediatrics that required surgical interventions. Materials and Methods: A retrospective review of case records of patients below 18 years old who underwent surgery from 1999 to 2010. Results: A total of 46 patients presented with 53 cases of cholesteatoma in which seven patients had bilateral disease. The age of presentation ranged from four to 18 years old with a mean age of 12 years. Male and female patients were 65% and 35% respectively. Otorrhoea or previous history of otorrhoea on presentation was found in 94% and 96% of them had hearing impairment. Cerebellopontine angle abscess, sigmoid sinus thrombosis and mastoiditis were among the complications. Tympanic membrane was retracted in 64% while 47% having had attic retraction and 53% had total atelectasis. A majority (85%) underwent canal wall down surgery with or without tympanoplasty. Post-operatively, 71% had improvement or preserved hearing level. The duration of follow up ranged from one month to 13 years and a quarter had recurrent disease and underwent revision surgeries. Conclusion: Majority of the cholesteatoma patients suffered from hearing loss and otorrhoea. Tympanic membrane retraction remained the most common clinical finding. Hence, children with persistent otorrhoea after adequate treatment may represent cholesteatoma. Surgical options of canal wall up and canal wall down procedures have equal risk of recurrence.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)71-77
Number of pages7
JournalBrunei International Medical Journal
Volume8
Issue number2
Publication statusPublished - 2012

Fingerprint

Cholesteatoma
Malaysia
Pediatrics
Tympanic Membrane
Hearing Loss
Mastoiditis
Intracranial Sinus Thrombosis
Cerebellopontine Angle
Tympanoplasty
Pulmonary Atelectasis
Sigmoid Colon
Disease Management
Reoperation
Abscess
Hearing
Recurrence

Keywords

  • Canal wall down
  • Canal wall up
  • Cholesteatoma
  • Hearing loss
  • Recurrence

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Medicine(all)

Cite this

Paediatric cholesteatoma : Experience of universiti kebangsaan malaysia medical centre. / Goh, Bee See; Teoh, Jian Woei; Faizah, Rahim; Lokman, Saim; Abdullah, Asma.

In: Brunei International Medical Journal, Vol. 8, No. 2, 2012, p. 71-77.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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