Outcomes and safety of retrograde intra-renal surgery for renal stones less than 2 cm in size

Chee Kong Christopher Ho, Guan Hee Tan, Eng Hong Goh, Praveen Singam, Badrulhisham Bahadzor, Zulkifli Md. Zainuddin

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

4 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Background: Retrograde intra-renal surgery (RIRS) has been used to remove stones of less than 2 cm in the kidney. however, its role is not well defined. Objectives: The objective of this study was to evaluate the outcomes and safety of RIRS, used either as a primary or secondary procedure, and to analyze factors predicting the stonefree rate (SFR). Patients and Methods: A retrospective analysis was performed on data from patients who underwent RIRS over a 10-year period (2002-2012). Stone size was measured as the surface area and was calculated according to the EAU guidelines. In cases of multiple stones, the total stone burden was calculated as the sum of each stone size. Stone burden was then classified as ≤ 80 mm2 or > 80 mm2. RIRS was classified as primary procedure or secondary procedure (after failed extracorporeal shockwave lithotripsy or percutaneous nephrolithotripsy). Stone clearance was defined as a complete absence of stones or stones < 4 mm, which were deemed insignificant on ultrasonography and plain radiography. Results: The overall SFR for renal stones treated with RIRS in our center was 55.4%, and the complication rate was 1.5%, which consisted of one case of sepsis. The only factor affecting SFR in this study was the indication for RIRS. When performed as a primary operation, RIRS showed a significantly better SFR (64.3%). The SFR for lower pole stones was only 44.4%. There were no statistically significant effects of stone burden, radio-opacity, or combination with ureteral stones on SFR. Conclusions: RIRS should be used as the primary treatment for renal stones whenever possible.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)454-457
Number of pages4
JournalNephro-Urology Monthly
Volume4
Issue number2
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2012

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Kidney
Safety
Lithotripsy
Radio
Radiography
Statistical Factor Analysis
Ultrasonography
Sepsis
Guidelines

Keywords

  • Calculi
  • Kidney
  • Ureteroscopy

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Urology

Cite this

Outcomes and safety of retrograde intra-renal surgery for renal stones less than 2 cm in size. / Ho, Chee Kong Christopher; Tan, Guan Hee; Goh, Eng Hong; Singam, Praveen; Bahadzor, Badrulhisham; Md. Zainuddin, Zulkifli.

In: Nephro-Urology Monthly, Vol. 4, No. 2, 2012, p. 454-457.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Ho, Chee Kong Christopher ; Tan, Guan Hee ; Goh, Eng Hong ; Singam, Praveen ; Bahadzor, Badrulhisham ; Md. Zainuddin, Zulkifli. / Outcomes and safety of retrograde intra-renal surgery for renal stones less than 2 cm in size. In: Nephro-Urology Monthly. 2012 ; Vol. 4, No. 2. pp. 454-457.
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