Outcome of skeletal reconstructive surgery for metastatic bone tumours in the femur

Nor Hazla Mohamed Haflah, Y. Kassim, I. Zuchri, W. Zulmi

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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Abstract

Introduction: The role of surgery in skeletal metastasis is to reduce morbidity and improve the quality of life in terminally ill patients. We report our experience with patients who underwent skeletal reconstructive surgery for metastatic bone tumour of the femur. Materials and Methods: Twenty nine operations for skeletal metastasis of the femur performed in our centre between 2009 and 2015 were included in this study. We evaluated the choice of implant, complications, survival rate and functional outcome. Fourteen patients were still alive at the time of this report for assessment of functional outcome using Musculoskeletal Tumour Society (MSTS) form. Results: Plating osteosynthesis with augmented-bone cement was the most common surgical procedure (17 patients) performed followed by arthroplasty (10 patients) and intramedullary nailing (2 patients) There were a total of five complications which were implant failures (2 patients), surgical site infection (2 patients), and site infection mortality (1 patient). The median survival rate was eight months. For the functional outcome, the mean MSTS score was 66%. Conclusion: Patients with skeletal metastasis may have prolonged survival and should undergo skeletal reconstruction to reduce morbidity and improve quality of life. The surgical construct should be stable and outlast the patient to avoid further surgery.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)28-34
Number of pages7
JournalMalaysian Orthopaedic Journal
Volume11
Issue number1
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 1 Mar 2017

Fingerprint

Reconstructive Surgical Procedures
Femur
Bone and Bones
Neoplasms
Neoplasm Metastasis
Survival Rate
Quality of Life
Morbidity
Surgical Wound Infection
Intramedullary Fracture Fixation
Terminally Ill
Bone Cements
Arthroplasty

Keywords

  • Complications
  • Functional outcome
  • Quality of life
  • Reconstructive surgery
  • Skeletal metastasis

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Surgery
  • Emergency Medicine
  • Orthopedics and Sports Medicine

Cite this

Outcome of skeletal reconstructive surgery for metastatic bone tumours in the femur. / Mohamed Haflah, Nor Hazla; Kassim, Y.; Zuchri, I.; Zulmi, W.

In: Malaysian Orthopaedic Journal, Vol. 11, No. 1, 01.03.2017, p. 28-34.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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