Optimal treatment for poor responders to ovarian stimulation

Does in vitro insemination offer any advantages to intrauterine insemination?

Simon Wood, Razrim Rahim, Tom Searle, Yasmin Sajjad, Stephen Troup, Iwan Lewis-Jones, Charles Kingsland

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

10 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

A retrospective study was performed of 1832 consecutive in vitro insemination (IVF)/intracytoplasmic sperm injection (ICSI) cycles over 18 months, to analyse the benefits or otherwise to the patient of continuing with in vitro treatment or converting the assisted conception cycle to intrauterine insemination (IUI). Two hundred and seventy cycles were identified in which three follicles or fewer were obtained after controlled ovarian hyperstimulation; in 143 of these cycles, the clinicians or patients elected to abandon all treatment, whereas treatment was continued in 127 patients. In 79 cycles, the patients proceeded with IVF/ICSI and in 48 patients, the cycles were converted to IUI. Data were analysed with regard to the clinical pregnancy rate. In addition, the data for IUI were compared with eight cycles of supraovulation IUI (S/IUI) performed over the same period. There were no significant differences in clinical pregnancy rates among any treatment modality 6/48 (12.5%), 6/79 (7.7%) and 1/8 (12.5%) for IUI, IVF and S/IUI, respectively (P = 0.64). The lowest total number of motile spermatozoa required to achieve pregnancy using IUI was 2.0 × 106. In conclusion, it appears that, if the treatment is suitable, patients who respond poorly to controlled hyperstimulation for IVF would not be disadvantaged in achieving a pregnancy by offering them conversion to the medically and financially less interventional IUI.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)13-18
Number of pages6
JournalHuman Fertility
Volume6
Issue number1
Publication statusPublished - 2003
Externally publishedYes

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Ovulation Induction
Insemination
Intracytoplasmic Sperm Injections
Pregnancy Rate
Therapeutics
Pregnancy
In Vitro Techniques
Vulnerable Populations
Spermatozoa
Retrospective Studies

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Obstetrics and Gynaecology

Cite this

Wood, S., Rahim, R., Searle, T., Sajjad, Y., Troup, S., Lewis-Jones, I., & Kingsland, C. (2003). Optimal treatment for poor responders to ovarian stimulation: Does in vitro insemination offer any advantages to intrauterine insemination? Human Fertility, 6(1), 13-18.

Optimal treatment for poor responders to ovarian stimulation : Does in vitro insemination offer any advantages to intrauterine insemination? / Wood, Simon; Rahim, Razrim; Searle, Tom; Sajjad, Yasmin; Troup, Stephen; Lewis-Jones, Iwan; Kingsland, Charles.

In: Human Fertility, Vol. 6, No. 1, 2003, p. 13-18.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Wood, S, Rahim, R, Searle, T, Sajjad, Y, Troup, S, Lewis-Jones, I & Kingsland, C 2003, 'Optimal treatment for poor responders to ovarian stimulation: Does in vitro insemination offer any advantages to intrauterine insemination?', Human Fertility, vol. 6, no. 1, pp. 13-18.
Wood, Simon ; Rahim, Razrim ; Searle, Tom ; Sajjad, Yasmin ; Troup, Stephen ; Lewis-Jones, Iwan ; Kingsland, Charles. / Optimal treatment for poor responders to ovarian stimulation : Does in vitro insemination offer any advantages to intrauterine insemination?. In: Human Fertility. 2003 ; Vol. 6, No. 1. pp. 13-18.
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