Online service failure

Diagnosing customer's evaluation of critical incidents outcomes

Maisarah Ahmad, Suhaila Abdul Kadir, Syed Shah Alam Syed Shah Alam, Nur Sa adah Muhamad, Nor Suryani Ab Ghani, Noorasikin Mohd Mandak

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

The rapid propagation of the internet over the last decades has changed the way customers and service providers conducting business. This study focuses on customer's evaluation on service encounters within an online setting and its consequences. Critical incident technique (CIT) was conducted to gain understanding of customer's perception on 'satisfactory' and 'dissatisfactory' online service encounter and to explore the underlying antecedents of customer's evaluation following an online service failure. A total of 26 written accounts of these critical incidents were content analysed through data obtained from interviews and open ended questionnaires sampled from online service customers. Four categories of failure have been classified: (a) unavailable service, (b) slow service, (c) systems failure and (d) other core service failure, adding another dimension to Bitner et al.'s (1990) 3-category responses to service failure. In particular, responses to technical systems failure (Category C) account for the biggest number of incidents captured in this study (46.2%). Although the majority of customers within Category B and C evaluated the recovery efforts as satisfactory, majority of others in the other categories assessed otherwise. The dynamics of these findings can help service providers to understand the underlying events or incidents that lead to customer satisfaction and dissatisfaction and eventually to improve their online service strategies.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)239-257
Number of pages19
JournalInternational Journal of Applied Business and Economic Research
Volume13
Issue number1
Publication statusPublished - 2015

Fingerprint

Critical incidents
Online services
Service failure
Evaluation
Service encounter
System failure
Incidents
Service provider
Service strategy
Customer perception
Propagation
Customer satisfaction
Customer dissatisfaction
World Wide Web
Critical incident technique
Questionnaire

Keywords

  • Critical incident
  • Customer's evaluation
  • Service encounters

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Business and International Management
  • Economics and Econometrics

Cite this

Online service failure : Diagnosing customer's evaluation of critical incidents outcomes. / Ahmad, Maisarah; Kadir, Suhaila Abdul; Syed Shah Alam, Syed Shah Alam; Muhamad, Nur Sa adah; Ghani, Nor Suryani Ab; Mandak, Noorasikin Mohd.

In: International Journal of Applied Business and Economic Research, Vol. 13, No. 1, 2015, p. 239-257.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Ahmad, Maisarah ; Kadir, Suhaila Abdul ; Syed Shah Alam, Syed Shah Alam ; Muhamad, Nur Sa adah ; Ghani, Nor Suryani Ab ; Mandak, Noorasikin Mohd. / Online service failure : Diagnosing customer's evaluation of critical incidents outcomes. In: International Journal of Applied Business and Economic Research. 2015 ; Vol. 13, No. 1. pp. 239-257.
@article{10824441db494b84a2b832287cc385ee,
title = "Online service failure: Diagnosing customer's evaluation of critical incidents outcomes",
abstract = "The rapid propagation of the internet over the last decades has changed the way customers and service providers conducting business. This study focuses on customer's evaluation on service encounters within an online setting and its consequences. Critical incident technique (CIT) was conducted to gain understanding of customer's perception on 'satisfactory' and 'dissatisfactory' online service encounter and to explore the underlying antecedents of customer's evaluation following an online service failure. A total of 26 written accounts of these critical incidents were content analysed through data obtained from interviews and open ended questionnaires sampled from online service customers. Four categories of failure have been classified: (a) unavailable service, (b) slow service, (c) systems failure and (d) other core service failure, adding another dimension to Bitner et al.'s (1990) 3-category responses to service failure. In particular, responses to technical systems failure (Category C) account for the biggest number of incidents captured in this study (46.2{\%}). Although the majority of customers within Category B and C evaluated the recovery efforts as satisfactory, majority of others in the other categories assessed otherwise. The dynamics of these findings can help service providers to understand the underlying events or incidents that lead to customer satisfaction and dissatisfaction and eventually to improve their online service strategies.",
keywords = "Critical incident, Customer's evaluation, Service encounters",
author = "Maisarah Ahmad and Kadir, {Suhaila Abdul} and {Syed Shah Alam}, {Syed Shah Alam} and Muhamad, {Nur Sa adah} and Ghani, {Nor Suryani Ab} and Mandak, {Noorasikin Mohd}",
year = "2015",
language = "English",
volume = "13",
pages = "239--257",
journal = "International Journal of Applied Business and Economic Research",
issn = "0972-7302",
publisher = "Serials Publications",
number = "1",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Online service failure

T2 - Diagnosing customer's evaluation of critical incidents outcomes

AU - Ahmad, Maisarah

AU - Kadir, Suhaila Abdul

AU - Syed Shah Alam, Syed Shah Alam

AU - Muhamad, Nur Sa adah

AU - Ghani, Nor Suryani Ab

AU - Mandak, Noorasikin Mohd

PY - 2015

Y1 - 2015

N2 - The rapid propagation of the internet over the last decades has changed the way customers and service providers conducting business. This study focuses on customer's evaluation on service encounters within an online setting and its consequences. Critical incident technique (CIT) was conducted to gain understanding of customer's perception on 'satisfactory' and 'dissatisfactory' online service encounter and to explore the underlying antecedents of customer's evaluation following an online service failure. A total of 26 written accounts of these critical incidents were content analysed through data obtained from interviews and open ended questionnaires sampled from online service customers. Four categories of failure have been classified: (a) unavailable service, (b) slow service, (c) systems failure and (d) other core service failure, adding another dimension to Bitner et al.'s (1990) 3-category responses to service failure. In particular, responses to technical systems failure (Category C) account for the biggest number of incidents captured in this study (46.2%). Although the majority of customers within Category B and C evaluated the recovery efforts as satisfactory, majority of others in the other categories assessed otherwise. The dynamics of these findings can help service providers to understand the underlying events or incidents that lead to customer satisfaction and dissatisfaction and eventually to improve their online service strategies.

AB - The rapid propagation of the internet over the last decades has changed the way customers and service providers conducting business. This study focuses on customer's evaluation on service encounters within an online setting and its consequences. Critical incident technique (CIT) was conducted to gain understanding of customer's perception on 'satisfactory' and 'dissatisfactory' online service encounter and to explore the underlying antecedents of customer's evaluation following an online service failure. A total of 26 written accounts of these critical incidents were content analysed through data obtained from interviews and open ended questionnaires sampled from online service customers. Four categories of failure have been classified: (a) unavailable service, (b) slow service, (c) systems failure and (d) other core service failure, adding another dimension to Bitner et al.'s (1990) 3-category responses to service failure. In particular, responses to technical systems failure (Category C) account for the biggest number of incidents captured in this study (46.2%). Although the majority of customers within Category B and C evaluated the recovery efforts as satisfactory, majority of others in the other categories assessed otherwise. The dynamics of these findings can help service providers to understand the underlying events or incidents that lead to customer satisfaction and dissatisfaction and eventually to improve their online service strategies.

KW - Critical incident

KW - Customer's evaluation

KW - Service encounters

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=84947295476&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=84947295476&partnerID=8YFLogxK

M3 - Article

VL - 13

SP - 239

EP - 257

JO - International Journal of Applied Business and Economic Research

JF - International Journal of Applied Business and Economic Research

SN - 0972-7302

IS - 1

ER -