Observations of Antarctic precipitable water vapor and its response to the solar activity based on GPS sensing

Wayan Suparta, Zainol Abidin Abdul Rashid, Mohd Alauddin Mohd. Ali, Baharudin Yatim, Grahame J. Fraser

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

70 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Predicting global climate change is a great challenge and must be based on a thorough understanding of how the climate system components behave. Precipitable water vapor (PWV) is one of the key components in determining and predicting the global climate system. It is well known that the local surface temperature and pressure have a direct influence on the production of PWV. However, the influence of solar activity on atmospheric dynamics and their physical mechanisms is still an open debate, where past studies are focused at mid-latitude regions. A new method of determining and quantifying the solar influence on PWV based on GPS observations to correlate the GPS PWV and total electron content (TEC) variations is proposed. Observed data from Scott Base (SBA) and McMurdo (MCM) stations from 2003 to 2005 have been used to study the response of PWV to solar activity. In the analysis, the effects of local conditions (wind speed and relative humidity) on the distribution of PWV are investigated. Results show significant correlation between PWV and solar activity for four geomagnetic storms, with correlation coefficients of 0.74, 0.77, 0.64 and 0.69, which are all significant at the 95% confidence level. There was no significant correlation between TEC and PWV changes during the absence of storms. On a monthly analysis, a strong relationship exists between PWV and TEC during storm-affected days, with correlation coefficients of 0.83 and 0.89 (99% confidence level) for SBA and MCM respectively. These indicate a statistically significant seasonal signal in the Antarctic region, which is very active (higher) during the summer and inactive (lower) for the winter periods.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)1419-1447
Number of pages29
JournalJournal of Atmospheric and Solar-Terrestrial Physics
Volume70
Issue number11-12
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Aug 2008

Fingerprint

precipitable water
solar activity
water vapor
GPS
correlation coefficients
climate
global climate
confidence
atmospheric dynamics
electrons
geomagnetic storm
magnetic storms
climate change
surface pressure
Antarctic regions
winter
surface temperature
summer
humidity
relative humidity

Keywords

  • Antarctica
  • GPS meteorology
  • PWV-TEC
  • Solar events

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Geophysics
  • Space and Planetary Science

Cite this

Observations of Antarctic precipitable water vapor and its response to the solar activity based on GPS sensing. / Suparta, Wayan; Abdul Rashid, Zainol Abidin; Mohd. Ali, Mohd Alauddin; Yatim, Baharudin; Fraser, Grahame J.

In: Journal of Atmospheric and Solar-Terrestrial Physics, Vol. 70, No. 11-12, 08.2008, p. 1419-1447.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Suparta, Wayan ; Abdul Rashid, Zainol Abidin ; Mohd. Ali, Mohd Alauddin ; Yatim, Baharudin ; Fraser, Grahame J. / Observations of Antarctic precipitable water vapor and its response to the solar activity based on GPS sensing. In: Journal of Atmospheric and Solar-Terrestrial Physics. 2008 ; Vol. 70, No. 11-12. pp. 1419-1447.
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