Obesity: how much does it matter for female pelvic organ prolapse?

Natharnia Young, Ixora Kamisan @ Atan, Rodrigo Guzman Rojas, Hans Peter Dietz

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

3 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Introduction and hypothesis: The objective was to determine the association between body mass index (BMI) and symptoms and signs of female pelvic organ prolapse (POP). Methods: An observational cross-sectional study of 964 archived datasets of women seen for symptoms and signs of lower urinary tract and pelvic organ dysfunction between September 2011 and February 2014 at a tertiary urogynaecology centre in Australia was carried out. An in-house standardised interview, the International Continence Society Pelvic Organ Prolapse Quantification (ICS POP-Q) and 4-D translabial ultrasound, followed by analysis of ultrasound volumes for pelvic organ descent and hiatal area on Valsalva, were performed, blinded against other data. Results: There is a positive association between BMI and posterior compartment prolapse on clinical examination and ultrasound imaging, but not for the anterior and central compartments. There was no association with prolapse symptom bother and a negative association with symptoms of prolapse. Conclusions: In this observational study, we found a strong association between all tested measures of posterior compartment descent and BMI, both clinical and on imaging.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)1-6
Number of pages6
JournalInternational Urogynecology Journal
DOIs
Publication statusAccepted/In press - 15 Sep 2017

Fingerprint

Pelvic Organ Prolapse
Prolapse
Body Mass Index
Obesity
Lower Urinary Tract Symptoms
Organ Size
Signs and Symptoms
Observational Studies
Ultrasonography
Cross-Sectional Studies
Interviews

Keywords

  • BMI
  • Obesity
  • Pelvic organ prolapse
  • Translabial ultrasound

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Obstetrics and Gynaecology
  • Urology

Cite this

Obesity : how much does it matter for female pelvic organ prolapse? / Young, Natharnia; Kamisan @ Atan, Ixora; Rojas, Rodrigo Guzman; Dietz, Hans Peter.

In: International Urogynecology Journal, 15.09.2017, p. 1-6.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Young, Natharnia ; Kamisan @ Atan, Ixora ; Rojas, Rodrigo Guzman ; Dietz, Hans Peter. / Obesity : how much does it matter for female pelvic organ prolapse?. In: International Urogynecology Journal. 2017 ; pp. 1-6.
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