Nutritional status and feeding problems in pediatric attention deficit-hyperactivity disorder

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2 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Background: Children with attention deficit-hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) may be at risk of nutrient deficiency due to the inability to sit through meals. This comparative cross-sectional study was therefore carried out to determine the nutritional status and feeding problems of ADHD children aged 4-12 years. Methods: Sociodemographic data, anthropometric measurements and 3 day dietary intake record were collected from 54 ADHD children and 54 typical development (TD) children. The Behavioral Pediatrics Feeding Assessment Scale was used to assess feeding problems. Results: Mean subject age was 8.6 ± 2.1 years. On anthropometric assessment, 11.1% of the ADHD children had wasting, while 1.9% had severe wasting. In contrast, none of the TD children had wasting. Approximately 5.6% of the ADHD children had stunting, as compared with 3.7% of the TD children, while none of the TD children had severe stunting compared with 3.7% of the ADHD children. More than half of the ADHD children had mid-upper arm circumference (MUAC) below the 5th percentile, indicating undernutrition, compared with only 35.2% of TD children. More than one-third of the ADHD children had feeding problems compared with 9.3% of TD children. There was a significant negative relationship between the ADHD children's feeding problems and bodyweight (r = -0338, P = 0.012), body mass index (r = -0322, P = 0.017) and MUAC (r = -0384, P = 0.004). Conclusion: Almost half of the ADHD children had suboptimal nutrition compared with 11.1% of the TD children. It is imperative to screen ADHD children for nutritional status and feeding problems to prevent negative health impacts later on.

Original languageEnglish
JournalPediatrics International
DOIs
Publication statusAccepted/In press - 2016

Fingerprint

Attention Deficit Disorder with Hyperactivity
Nutritional Status
Pediatrics
Child Development
Growth Disorders
Arm
Diet Records
Malnutrition
Meals
Body Mass Index
Cross-Sectional Studies
Food

Keywords

  • Attention deficit-hyperactivity disorder
  • Child
  • Feeding problem
  • Nutrition

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Pediatrics, Perinatology, and Child Health

Cite this

@article{082a281dea0d42bc93ec880dcc0f5019,
title = "Nutritional status and feeding problems in pediatric attention deficit-hyperactivity disorder",
abstract = "Background: Children with attention deficit-hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) may be at risk of nutrient deficiency due to the inability to sit through meals. This comparative cross-sectional study was therefore carried out to determine the nutritional status and feeding problems of ADHD children aged 4-12 years. Methods: Sociodemographic data, anthropometric measurements and 3 day dietary intake record were collected from 54 ADHD children and 54 typical development (TD) children. The Behavioral Pediatrics Feeding Assessment Scale was used to assess feeding problems. Results: Mean subject age was 8.6 ± 2.1 years. On anthropometric assessment, 11.1{\%} of the ADHD children had wasting, while 1.9{\%} had severe wasting. In contrast, none of the TD children had wasting. Approximately 5.6{\%} of the ADHD children had stunting, as compared with 3.7{\%} of the TD children, while none of the TD children had severe stunting compared with 3.7{\%} of the ADHD children. More than half of the ADHD children had mid-upper arm circumference (MUAC) below the 5th percentile, indicating undernutrition, compared with only 35.2{\%} of TD children. More than one-third of the ADHD children had feeding problems compared with 9.3{\%} of TD children. There was a significant negative relationship between the ADHD children's feeding problems and bodyweight (r = -0338, P = 0.012), body mass index (r = -0322, P = 0.017) and MUAC (r = -0384, P = 0.004). Conclusion: Almost half of the ADHD children had suboptimal nutrition compared with 11.1{\%} of the TD children. It is imperative to screen ADHD children for nutritional status and feeding problems to prevent negative health impacts later on.",
keywords = "Attention deficit-hyperactivity disorder, Child, Feeding problem, Nutrition",
author = "Norsuhaila Sha'ari and {Abdul Manaf}, Zahara and Mahadir Ahmad and {Abdul Rahman}, {Fairuz Nazri}",
year = "2016",
doi = "10.1111/ped.13196",
language = "English",
journal = "Pediatrics International",
issn = "1328-8067",
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TY - JOUR

T1 - Nutritional status and feeding problems in pediatric attention deficit-hyperactivity disorder

AU - Sha'ari, Norsuhaila

AU - Abdul Manaf, Zahara

AU - Ahmad, Mahadir

AU - Abdul Rahman, Fairuz Nazri

PY - 2016

Y1 - 2016

N2 - Background: Children with attention deficit-hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) may be at risk of nutrient deficiency due to the inability to sit through meals. This comparative cross-sectional study was therefore carried out to determine the nutritional status and feeding problems of ADHD children aged 4-12 years. Methods: Sociodemographic data, anthropometric measurements and 3 day dietary intake record were collected from 54 ADHD children and 54 typical development (TD) children. The Behavioral Pediatrics Feeding Assessment Scale was used to assess feeding problems. Results: Mean subject age was 8.6 ± 2.1 years. On anthropometric assessment, 11.1% of the ADHD children had wasting, while 1.9% had severe wasting. In contrast, none of the TD children had wasting. Approximately 5.6% of the ADHD children had stunting, as compared with 3.7% of the TD children, while none of the TD children had severe stunting compared with 3.7% of the ADHD children. More than half of the ADHD children had mid-upper arm circumference (MUAC) below the 5th percentile, indicating undernutrition, compared with only 35.2% of TD children. More than one-third of the ADHD children had feeding problems compared with 9.3% of TD children. There was a significant negative relationship between the ADHD children's feeding problems and bodyweight (r = -0338, P = 0.012), body mass index (r = -0322, P = 0.017) and MUAC (r = -0384, P = 0.004). Conclusion: Almost half of the ADHD children had suboptimal nutrition compared with 11.1% of the TD children. It is imperative to screen ADHD children for nutritional status and feeding problems to prevent negative health impacts later on.

AB - Background: Children with attention deficit-hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) may be at risk of nutrient deficiency due to the inability to sit through meals. This comparative cross-sectional study was therefore carried out to determine the nutritional status and feeding problems of ADHD children aged 4-12 years. Methods: Sociodemographic data, anthropometric measurements and 3 day dietary intake record were collected from 54 ADHD children and 54 typical development (TD) children. The Behavioral Pediatrics Feeding Assessment Scale was used to assess feeding problems. Results: Mean subject age was 8.6 ± 2.1 years. On anthropometric assessment, 11.1% of the ADHD children had wasting, while 1.9% had severe wasting. In contrast, none of the TD children had wasting. Approximately 5.6% of the ADHD children had stunting, as compared with 3.7% of the TD children, while none of the TD children had severe stunting compared with 3.7% of the ADHD children. More than half of the ADHD children had mid-upper arm circumference (MUAC) below the 5th percentile, indicating undernutrition, compared with only 35.2% of TD children. More than one-third of the ADHD children had feeding problems compared with 9.3% of TD children. There was a significant negative relationship between the ADHD children's feeding problems and bodyweight (r = -0338, P = 0.012), body mass index (r = -0322, P = 0.017) and MUAC (r = -0384, P = 0.004). Conclusion: Almost half of the ADHD children had suboptimal nutrition compared with 11.1% of the TD children. It is imperative to screen ADHD children for nutritional status and feeding problems to prevent negative health impacts later on.

KW - Attention deficit-hyperactivity disorder

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