Novel precursor of nitrogen for the synthesis of TiC0.7N0.3 through vacuum oven-induced combustion

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

TiC0.7N0.3 is widely used as a cutting tool and an abrasion-resistant material for operations requiring high wear resistance and strength. In this study, we attempted to solve one of the main issues in TiC0.7N0.3; synthesis at high temperature (>1000 °C). The use of NH4NO3 powder was put forward for the first time as a precursor to supply N2 gas for synthesizing TiC0.7N0.3 nanopowders at a low temperature of 180 °C. Ti, C, and NH4NO3 served as feedstocks. Raw materials were mixed at different milling times (1, 5, 10, 15, and 20 h) at 300 rpm in Ar gas to avoid oxidation. XRD results revealed that no new peaks of TiC0.7N0.3 appeared after milling. Prior to vacuum synthesis at 180 °C, the as-milled powders were dried at 50 °C for 1 h and shaped into cylindrical pellets under a pressure of 150 MPa. The TiC0.7N0.3 peaks were distinctively present at 5–20 h except for samples milled at 1 h. Notably, activation energy decreased from 256.9 kJ/mol to 76.68 kJ/mol with prolonged milling time from 1 h to 20 h. This decrease was due to the decreased activation energy with prolonged milling time. The reaction between C and NH4NO3 was found to be exothermic, which favored the release of N2. With increased temperature caused by the exothermic reaction, the melted Ti particles reacted simultaneously with the released N2 gas, whereas the remaining C synthesized TiC0.7N0.3.

Original languageEnglish
JournalCeramics International
DOIs
Publication statusAccepted/In press - 1 Jan 2020

Fingerprint

Ovens
Nitrogen
Vacuum
Powders
Activation energy
Gases
Exothermic reactions
Gas supply
Cutting tools
Abrasion
Temperature
Feedstocks
Wear resistance
Raw materials
Oxidation

Keywords

  • Activation energy
  • Kissinger equation
  • Morphology
  • Synthesis
  • TiCN

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Electronic, Optical and Magnetic Materials
  • Ceramics and Composites
  • Process Chemistry and Technology
  • Surfaces, Coatings and Films
  • Materials Chemistry

Cite this

@article{c6705ee052df425db9e43da55ab4255b,
title = "Novel precursor of nitrogen for the synthesis of TiC0.7N0.3 through vacuum oven-induced combustion",
abstract = "TiC0.7N0.3 is widely used as a cutting tool and an abrasion-resistant material for operations requiring high wear resistance and strength. In this study, we attempted to solve one of the main issues in TiC0.7N0.3; synthesis at high temperature (>1000 °C). The use of NH4NO3 powder was put forward for the first time as a precursor to supply N2 gas for synthesizing TiC0.7N0.3 nanopowders at a low temperature of 180 °C. Ti, C, and NH4NO3 served as feedstocks. Raw materials were mixed at different milling times (1, 5, 10, 15, and 20 h) at 300 rpm in Ar gas to avoid oxidation. XRD results revealed that no new peaks of TiC0.7N0.3 appeared after milling. Prior to vacuum synthesis at 180 °C, the as-milled powders were dried at 50 °C for 1 h and shaped into cylindrical pellets under a pressure of 150 MPa. The TiC0.7N0.3 peaks were distinctively present at 5–20 h except for samples milled at 1 h. Notably, activation energy decreased from 256.9 kJ/mol to 76.68 kJ/mol with prolonged milling time from 1 h to 20 h. This decrease was due to the decreased activation energy with prolonged milling time. The reaction between C and NH4NO3 was found to be exothermic, which favored the release of N2. With increased temperature caused by the exothermic reaction, the melted Ti particles reacted simultaneously with the released N2 gas, whereas the remaining C synthesized TiC0.7N0.3.",
keywords = "Activation energy, Kissinger equation, Morphology, Synthesis, TiCN",
author = "Armin Rajabi and Ghazali, {Mariyam Jameelah} and Mohamed, {Intan Fadhlina} and Norhamidi Muhamad",
year = "2020",
month = "1",
day = "1",
doi = "10.1016/j.ceramint.2019.12.181",
language = "English",
journal = "Ceramics International",
issn = "0272-8842",
publisher = "Elsevier Limited",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Novel precursor of nitrogen for the synthesis of TiC0.7N0.3 through vacuum oven-induced combustion

AU - Rajabi, Armin

AU - Ghazali, Mariyam Jameelah

AU - Mohamed, Intan Fadhlina

AU - Muhamad, Norhamidi

PY - 2020/1/1

Y1 - 2020/1/1

N2 - TiC0.7N0.3 is widely used as a cutting tool and an abrasion-resistant material for operations requiring high wear resistance and strength. In this study, we attempted to solve one of the main issues in TiC0.7N0.3; synthesis at high temperature (>1000 °C). The use of NH4NO3 powder was put forward for the first time as a precursor to supply N2 gas for synthesizing TiC0.7N0.3 nanopowders at a low temperature of 180 °C. Ti, C, and NH4NO3 served as feedstocks. Raw materials were mixed at different milling times (1, 5, 10, 15, and 20 h) at 300 rpm in Ar gas to avoid oxidation. XRD results revealed that no new peaks of TiC0.7N0.3 appeared after milling. Prior to vacuum synthesis at 180 °C, the as-milled powders were dried at 50 °C for 1 h and shaped into cylindrical pellets under a pressure of 150 MPa. The TiC0.7N0.3 peaks were distinctively present at 5–20 h except for samples milled at 1 h. Notably, activation energy decreased from 256.9 kJ/mol to 76.68 kJ/mol with prolonged milling time from 1 h to 20 h. This decrease was due to the decreased activation energy with prolonged milling time. The reaction between C and NH4NO3 was found to be exothermic, which favored the release of N2. With increased temperature caused by the exothermic reaction, the melted Ti particles reacted simultaneously with the released N2 gas, whereas the remaining C synthesized TiC0.7N0.3.

AB - TiC0.7N0.3 is widely used as a cutting tool and an abrasion-resistant material for operations requiring high wear resistance and strength. In this study, we attempted to solve one of the main issues in TiC0.7N0.3; synthesis at high temperature (>1000 °C). The use of NH4NO3 powder was put forward for the first time as a precursor to supply N2 gas for synthesizing TiC0.7N0.3 nanopowders at a low temperature of 180 °C. Ti, C, and NH4NO3 served as feedstocks. Raw materials were mixed at different milling times (1, 5, 10, 15, and 20 h) at 300 rpm in Ar gas to avoid oxidation. XRD results revealed that no new peaks of TiC0.7N0.3 appeared after milling. Prior to vacuum synthesis at 180 °C, the as-milled powders were dried at 50 °C for 1 h and shaped into cylindrical pellets under a pressure of 150 MPa. The TiC0.7N0.3 peaks were distinctively present at 5–20 h except for samples milled at 1 h. Notably, activation energy decreased from 256.9 kJ/mol to 76.68 kJ/mol with prolonged milling time from 1 h to 20 h. This decrease was due to the decreased activation energy with prolonged milling time. The reaction between C and NH4NO3 was found to be exothermic, which favored the release of N2. With increased temperature caused by the exothermic reaction, the melted Ti particles reacted simultaneously with the released N2 gas, whereas the remaining C synthesized TiC0.7N0.3.

KW - Activation energy

KW - Kissinger equation

KW - Morphology

KW - Synthesis

KW - TiCN

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=85077355024&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=85077355024&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1016/j.ceramint.2019.12.181

DO - 10.1016/j.ceramint.2019.12.181

M3 - Article

AN - SCOPUS:85077355024

JO - Ceramics International

JF - Ceramics International

SN - 0272-8842

ER -