Noneconomic distortions in international agricultural trade: The case of palm oil in the u.s

Jamal Othman, Jack E. Houston, Glenn C W Ames

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

8 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

A U.S. import demand model for palm oil empirically addresses the objectives of ascertaining whether significant shifts in U.S. import patterns for palm oil followed an American Soybean Association negative informational campaign against "fatty" tropical oils and whether factors such as exchange rates significantly affected the decline of U.S. palm oil imports after the campaign. Evidence suggests that structural change in U.S. import demand for palm oil followed commencement of the campaign, including significant changes in the own- and cross-price responsiveness of palm oil. Results also indicate that exchange rates did not contribute to declining U.S. palm oil imports.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)79-89
Number of pages11
JournalJournal of International Food and Agribusiness Marketing
Volume7
Issue number2
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 29 Sep 1995

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palm oils
imports
Elaeis oleifera
Soybeans
palm oil
Palm oil
Agricultural trade
soybeans
Oils
oils
Import

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Business and International Management
  • Marketing
  • Food Science

Cite this

Noneconomic distortions in international agricultural trade : The case of palm oil in the u.s. / Othman, Jamal; Houston, Jack E.; Ames, Glenn C W.

In: Journal of International Food and Agribusiness Marketing, Vol. 7, No. 2, 29.09.1995, p. 79-89.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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