Non-occupational exposure of Malay women in Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia, to cadmium and lead

Chan Seok Moon, Zuo Wen Zhang, Takao Watanabe, Shinichiro Shimbo, Noor Hassim Ismail, Jamal Hisham Hashim, Masayuki Ikeda

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

33 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Peripheral blood and 24-h total food duplicate samples were obtained from 49 adult Malay women in Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia, in July, 1995. Samples of boiled and uncooked (raw) rice were also collected from the subjects. The blood samples, homogenates of each food duplicates and rice samples (both cooked and raw) were digested by heating in the presence of mineral acids, and the digests were subjected to analysis for cadmium (Cd) and lead (Pb) with a system composed of a fully automated liquid sampler, a graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrometer and a data processor. The geometric mean metal concentrations in blood were 0.71 ng Cd per ml and 45.6 ng Pb per ml, and the dietary metal intakes were 7.31 μg Cd per day and 10.1 μg Pb per day. The metal intake via rice accounted for 53% and 13% of total dietary intake of cadmium and lead, respectively. When the absorption from the air and foods was compared, the cadmium burden came almost exclusively from foods, whereas the lead burden came both from air (44%) and foods (56%).

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)81-85
Number of pages5
JournalBiomarkers
Volume1
Issue number2
Publication statusPublished - Apr 1996

Fingerprint

Malaysia
Cadmium
Food
Blood
Metals
Air
Graphite
Heating
Minerals
Spectrometers
Furnaces
Acids
Liquids
Lead
Oryza

Keywords

  • Blood
  • Cadmium
  • Environmental pollution
  • Food duplicate
  • Lead
  • Malay women
  • Rice

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Biotechnology
  • Toxicology

Cite this

Moon, C. S., Zhang, Z. W., Watanabe, T., Shimbo, S., Ismail, N. H., Hashim, J. H., & Ikeda, M. (1996). Non-occupational exposure of Malay women in Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia, to cadmium and lead. Biomarkers, 1(2), 81-85.

Non-occupational exposure of Malay women in Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia, to cadmium and lead. / Moon, Chan Seok; Zhang, Zuo Wen; Watanabe, Takao; Shimbo, Shinichiro; Ismail, Noor Hassim; Hashim, Jamal Hisham; Ikeda, Masayuki.

In: Biomarkers, Vol. 1, No. 2, 04.1996, p. 81-85.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Moon, CS, Zhang, ZW, Watanabe, T, Shimbo, S, Ismail, NH, Hashim, JH & Ikeda, M 1996, 'Non-occupational exposure of Malay women in Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia, to cadmium and lead', Biomarkers, vol. 1, no. 2, pp. 81-85.
Moon CS, Zhang ZW, Watanabe T, Shimbo S, Ismail NH, Hashim JH et al. Non-occupational exposure of Malay women in Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia, to cadmium and lead. Biomarkers. 1996 Apr;1(2):81-85.
Moon, Chan Seok ; Zhang, Zuo Wen ; Watanabe, Takao ; Shimbo, Shinichiro ; Ismail, Noor Hassim ; Hashim, Jamal Hisham ; Ikeda, Masayuki. / Non-occupational exposure of Malay women in Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia, to cadmium and lead. In: Biomarkers. 1996 ; Vol. 1, No. 2. pp. 81-85.
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