Noise Levels Encountered in Dental Clinical and Laboratory Practice

James C. Setcos, Alida Mahyuddin

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

34 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Purpose: The aim of this study was to determine the noise levels made by different clinical handpieces, laboratory engines, and other significant equipment such as ultrasonic scalers, amalgamators, high-speed evacuation, and other items. Materials and Methods: Sound levels were measured at four dental practices and three dental laboratories selected as representative of a variety of workplaces to reveal a range of noise. The noise levels were determined using a precision sound level meter, which was positioned at ear level and also at 2 meters distance from the operator. Results: Virtually all noise levels at the dental clinics were below 85 dB(A). The noise levels in the dental laboratories had much higher maxima, with some cutting activities, steam cleaning, and sandblasting up to 90 dB(A), and compressed air blasts with a maximum of 96 dB(A). Conclusions: The noise levels in the dental clinics are considered to be below the limit of risk of hearing loss. However, technicians and other personnel who spend many hours in noisy dental laboratories may be at risk if they choose not to wear ear protection.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)150-157
Number of pages8
JournalInternational Journal of Prosthodontics
Volume11
Issue number2
Publication statusPublished - 1998
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Dental Laboratories
Noise
Dental Clinics
Ear
Compressed Air
Steam
Hearing Loss
Ultrasonics
Workplace
Tooth
Equipment and Supplies

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Dentistry(all)

Cite this

Noise Levels Encountered in Dental Clinical and Laboratory Practice. / Setcos, James C.; Mahyuddin, Alida.

In: International Journal of Prosthodontics, Vol. 11, No. 2, 1998, p. 150-157.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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