Niche separation in flycatcher-like species in the lowland rainforests of Malaysia

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

4 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Niche theory suggests that sympatric species reduce interspecific competition through segregation of shared resources by adopting different attack manoeuvres. However, the fact that flycatcher-like bird species exclusively use the sally manoeuvre may thus challenge this view. We studied the foraging ecology of three flycatcher-like species (i.e. Paradise-flycatcher Terpsiphone sp., Black-naped Monarch Hypothymis azurea, and Rufous-winged Philentoma Philentoma pyrhoptera) in the Krau Wildlife Reserve in central Peninsular Malaysia. We investigated foraging preferences of each bird species and the potential niche partitioning via spatial or behavioural segregation. Foraging substrate was important parameter that effectively divided paradise-flycatcher from Black-naped Monarch and Rufous-winged Philentoma, where monarch and philentoma foraged mainly on live green leaves, while paradise-flycatcher foraged on the air. They also exhibited different foraging height preferences. Paradise-flycatcher, for instance, preferred the highest studied strata, while Black-naped Monarch foraged mostly in lower strata, and Rufous-winged Philentoma made use of the lowest strata. This study indicates that niche segregation occurs among sympatric species through foraging substrate and attack manoeuvres selection.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)121-126
Number of pages6
JournalBehavioural Processes
Volume140
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 1 Jul 2017

Fingerprint

Songbirds
Malaysia
rain forests
lowlands
niches
foraging
Sympatry
sympatry
Birds
birds
interspecific competition
Ecology
conservation areas
Rainforest
ecology
air
Air
leaves

Keywords

  • Behaviour
  • Foraging strategies
  • Insectivorous birds
  • Resource partitioning
  • Southeast asia
  • Tropical forest

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Animal Science and Zoology
  • Behavioral Neuroscience

Cite this

Niche separation in flycatcher-like species in the lowland rainforests of Malaysia. / Mansor, Mohammad Saiful; Ramli, Rosli.

In: Behavioural Processes, Vol. 140, 01.07.2017, p. 121-126.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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