Newborn hearing screening

Experience in a Malaysian hospital

Asma Abdullah, M. Y S Hazim, A. Almyzan, A. G. Jamilah, S. Roslin, M. T. Ann, L. Borhan, Abdullah Sani Mohamed, L. Saim, N. Y. Boo

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

15 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Introduction: This study aims to determine the prevalence of hearing loss among newborns delivered at Hospital Universiti Kebangsaan Malaysia and to evaluate the usefulness of our hearing screening protocol. Methods: All infants born in the hospital over a nine-month period, between April to December 2003, were screened for hearing loss with a portable otoacoustic emission (OAE) before discharge. At the age of two months, a second OAE test was repeated on newborns who failed the initial test. Those who failed the second test were re-tested at three months of age. When these infants failed the third OAE test, a brainstem evoked response (BSER) test was performed. Results: During the study period, 4,219 infants were born in the hospital, and 3,762 (89.2 percent) underwent OAE screening. 620 (19.7 percent) of them failed the first screening test, and 506 (81.6 percent) of them came for a second stage-screening test. In the third stage screening at three months of age, only 39 (65 percent) patients turned up. Of these, ten infants passed the OAE test and 29 failed. However, when these infants underwent BSER, 13 had normal BSER and 16 have abnormal BSER. The prevalence of hearing loss in this study was 0.42 percent (16/3,762). Conclusion: The large number of defaulters and false-positive results in this study suggest that this pilot hearing-screen programme requires fine-tuning to minimise these problems.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)60-64
Number of pages5
JournalSingapore Medical Journal
Volume47
Issue number1
Publication statusPublished - Jan 2006

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Hearing
Brain Stem
Newborn Infant
Hearing Loss
Malaysia

Keywords

  • Brainstem evoked response
  • Hearing loss
  • Newborn screening
  • Otoacoustic emission

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Medicine(all)

Cite this

Abdullah, A., Hazim, M. Y. S., Almyzan, A., Jamilah, A. G., Roslin, S., Ann, M. T., ... Boo, N. Y. (2006). Newborn hearing screening: Experience in a Malaysian hospital. Singapore Medical Journal, 47(1), 60-64.

Newborn hearing screening : Experience in a Malaysian hospital. / Abdullah, Asma; Hazim, M. Y S; Almyzan, A.; Jamilah, A. G.; Roslin, S.; Ann, M. T.; Borhan, L.; Mohamed, Abdullah Sani; Saim, L.; Boo, N. Y.

In: Singapore Medical Journal, Vol. 47, No. 1, 01.2006, p. 60-64.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abdullah, A, Hazim, MYS, Almyzan, A, Jamilah, AG, Roslin, S, Ann, MT, Borhan, L, Mohamed, AS, Saim, L & Boo, NY 2006, 'Newborn hearing screening: Experience in a Malaysian hospital', Singapore Medical Journal, vol. 47, no. 1, pp. 60-64.
Abdullah A, Hazim MYS, Almyzan A, Jamilah AG, Roslin S, Ann MT et al. Newborn hearing screening: Experience in a Malaysian hospital. Singapore Medical Journal. 2006 Jan;47(1):60-64.
Abdullah, Asma ; Hazim, M. Y S ; Almyzan, A. ; Jamilah, A. G. ; Roslin, S. ; Ann, M. T. ; Borhan, L. ; Mohamed, Abdullah Sani ; Saim, L. ; Boo, N. Y. / Newborn hearing screening : Experience in a Malaysian hospital. In: Singapore Medical Journal. 2006 ; Vol. 47, No. 1. pp. 60-64.
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AB - Introduction: This study aims to determine the prevalence of hearing loss among newborns delivered at Hospital Universiti Kebangsaan Malaysia and to evaluate the usefulness of our hearing screening protocol. Methods: All infants born in the hospital over a nine-month period, between April to December 2003, were screened for hearing loss with a portable otoacoustic emission (OAE) before discharge. At the age of two months, a second OAE test was repeated on newborns who failed the initial test. Those who failed the second test were re-tested at three months of age. When these infants failed the third OAE test, a brainstem evoked response (BSER) test was performed. Results: During the study period, 4,219 infants were born in the hospital, and 3,762 (89.2 percent) underwent OAE screening. 620 (19.7 percent) of them failed the first screening test, and 506 (81.6 percent) of them came for a second stage-screening test. In the third stage screening at three months of age, only 39 (65 percent) patients turned up. Of these, ten infants passed the OAE test and 29 failed. However, when these infants underwent BSER, 13 had normal BSER and 16 have abnormal BSER. The prevalence of hearing loss in this study was 0.42 percent (16/3,762). Conclusion: The large number of defaulters and false-positive results in this study suggest that this pilot hearing-screen programme requires fine-tuning to minimise these problems.

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