New Insights of Microsporidial Infection among Asymptomatic Aboriginal Population in Malaysia

Tengku Shahrul Anuar, Hesham M. Al-Mekhlafi, Fatmah Md Salleh, Norhayati Moktar

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

12 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Background:Studies on microsporidial infection mostly focus on immunodeficiency or immunosuppressive individuals. Therefore, this cross-sectional study describes the prevalence and risk factors of microsporidiosis among asymptomatic individuals in Malaysia.Methods/Findings:Four hundred and forty seven stool samples were collected and examined for microsporidia after staining with Gram-chromotrope Kinyoun. Demographic, socioeconomic, environmental, and behavioral information were collected by using a pre-tested questionnaire. Overall, 67 (15%) samples were positive for microsporidia. The prevalence of infection was significantly higher among individuals aged more than 15 years compared to those aged <15 years (OR = 1.97, 95% CI = 1.08, 3.62; P = 0.028). Furthermore, logistic regression analysis confirmed that the presence of other family members infected with microsporidia (OR = 8.45; 95% CI = 4.30, 16.62; P<0.001) and being a consumer of raw vegetables (OR = 2.05; 95% CI = 1.15, 3.66; P = 0.016) were the significant risk factors of this infection.Conclusions:These findings clearly show that exposure to microsporidia is common among Aboriginal population. Further studies using molecular approach on microsporidia isolates from asymptomatic individuals is needed to determine species-specific. The risk factors associated with microsporidiosis will help in identifying more clearly the sources of the infection in the environment that pose a risk for transmission so that preventive strategies can be implemented.

Original languageEnglish
Article numbere71870
JournalPLoS One
Volume8
Issue number8
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 27 Aug 2013

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Microsporidia
Asymptomatic Infections
Malaysia
Microsporidiosis
microsporidiosis
infection
risk factors
Population
Infection
Vegetables
Immunosuppressive Agents
immunosuppressive agents
Regression analysis
raw vegetables
immunosuppression
Logistics
cross-sectional studies
socioeconomics
regression analysis
demographic statistics

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Agricultural and Biological Sciences(all)
  • Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology(all)
  • Medicine(all)

Cite this

New Insights of Microsporidial Infection among Asymptomatic Aboriginal Population in Malaysia. / Shahrul Anuar, Tengku; Al-Mekhlafi, Hesham M.; Md Salleh, Fatmah; Moktar, Norhayati.

In: PLoS One, Vol. 8, No. 8, e71870, 27.08.2013.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Shahrul Anuar, Tengku ; Al-Mekhlafi, Hesham M. ; Md Salleh, Fatmah ; Moktar, Norhayati. / New Insights of Microsporidial Infection among Asymptomatic Aboriginal Population in Malaysia. In: PLoS One. 2013 ; Vol. 8, No. 8.
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