Naturally acquired antibody response to Plasmodium falciparum describes heterogeneity in transmission on islands in Lake Victoria

Zulkarnain Md Idris, Chim W. Chan, James Kongere, Tom Hall, John Logedi, Jesse Gitaka, Chris Drakeley, Akira Kaneko

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Abstract

As markers of exposure anti-malaria antibody responses can help characterise heterogeneity in malaria transmission. In the present study antibody responses to Plasmodium falciparum AMA-1, MSP-119 and CSP were measured with the aim to describe transmission patterns in meso-endemic settings in Lake Victoria. Two cross-sectional surveys were conducted in Lake Victoria in January and August 2012. The study area comprised of three settings: mainland (Ungoye), large island (Mfangano) and small islands (Takawiri, Kibuogi, Ngodhe). Individuals provided a finger-blood sample to assess malaria infection by microscopy and PCR. Antibody response to P. falciparum was determined in 4,112 individuals by ELISA using eluted dried blood from filter paper. The overall seroprevalence was 64.0% for AMA-1, 39.5% for MSP-119, and 12.9% for CSP. Between settings, seroprevalences for merozoite antigens were similar between Ungoye and Mfangano, but higher when compared to the small islands. For AMA-1, the seroconversion rates (SCRs) ranged from 0.121 (Ngodhe) to 0.202 (Ungoye), and were strongly correlated to parasite prevalence. We observed heterogeneity in serological indices across study sites in Lake Victoria. These data suggest that AMA-1 and MSP-119 sero-epidemiological analysis may provide further evidence in assessing variation in malaria exposure and evaluating malaria control efforts in high endemic area.

Original languageEnglish
Article number9123
JournalScientific Reports
Volume7
Issue number1
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 1 Dec 2017

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Victoria
Plasmodium falciparum
Lakes
Islands
Malaria
Antibody Formation
Merozoite Surface Protein 1
Seroepidemiologic Studies
Merozoites
Fingers
Microscopy
Anti-Idiotypic Antibodies
Parasites
Cross-Sectional Studies
Enzyme-Linked Immunosorbent Assay
Antigens
Polymerase Chain Reaction
Infection

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • General

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Naturally acquired antibody response to Plasmodium falciparum describes heterogeneity in transmission on islands in Lake Victoria. / Md Idris, Zulkarnain; Chan, Chim W.; Kongere, James; Hall, Tom; Logedi, John; Gitaka, Jesse; Drakeley, Chris; Kaneko, Akira.

In: Scientific Reports, Vol. 7, No. 1, 9123, 01.12.2017.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Md Idris, Zulkarnain ; Chan, Chim W. ; Kongere, James ; Hall, Tom ; Logedi, John ; Gitaka, Jesse ; Drakeley, Chris ; Kaneko, Akira. / Naturally acquired antibody response to Plasmodium falciparum describes heterogeneity in transmission on islands in Lake Victoria. In: Scientific Reports. 2017 ; Vol. 7, No. 1.
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abstract = "As markers of exposure anti-malaria antibody responses can help characterise heterogeneity in malaria transmission. In the present study antibody responses to Plasmodium falciparum AMA-1, MSP-119 and CSP were measured with the aim to describe transmission patterns in meso-endemic settings in Lake Victoria. Two cross-sectional surveys were conducted in Lake Victoria in January and August 2012. The study area comprised of three settings: mainland (Ungoye), large island (Mfangano) and small islands (Takawiri, Kibuogi, Ngodhe). Individuals provided a finger-blood sample to assess malaria infection by microscopy and PCR. Antibody response to P. falciparum was determined in 4,112 individuals by ELISA using eluted dried blood from filter paper. The overall seroprevalence was 64.0{\%} for AMA-1, 39.5{\%} for MSP-119, and 12.9{\%} for CSP. Between settings, seroprevalences for merozoite antigens were similar between Ungoye and Mfangano, but higher when compared to the small islands. For AMA-1, the seroconversion rates (SCRs) ranged from 0.121 (Ngodhe) to 0.202 (Ungoye), and were strongly correlated to parasite prevalence. We observed heterogeneity in serological indices across study sites in Lake Victoria. These data suggest that AMA-1 and MSP-119 sero-epidemiological analysis may provide further evidence in assessing variation in malaria exposure and evaluating malaria control efforts in high endemic area.",
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