Natural honey modulates physiological glycemic response compared to simulated honey and D-glucose

A. Ahmad, M. K. Azim, Osman Mesaik Mohammed Ahmed Hassan, Nazimuddin, R. A. Khan

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

23 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The present study is undertaken to find out the relative glycemic tolerance of natural honey compared with simulated honey and D-glucose using oral glucose tolerance tested up to 180 min. Twenty-six healthy human subjects with mean age of 28.6 ± 9.3 y were randomly divided into 3 groups, that is, natural honey consumers (NHC; n = 13), simulated honey consumers (AHC; n = 6), and D-glucose consumers (DGC; n = 7). After recording fasting blood glucose, the participants consumed either natural honey or simulated honey or D-glucose (1g/kg body weight). Subsequently, additional plasma glucose levels (PGLs) were recorded at 60, 120, and 180 min. At 60 min, DGC and AHC group members exhibited similar PGL elevation (that is, 52% and 47%, respectively) compared to NHC group with only 20% increment. On the other hand, after 180 min, 20% decrease in PGL was observed in the DGC group compared to 9.75% reduction in the NHC group. These observations are primarily in line with earlier studies. Results analyzed by one-way analysis of variance (ANOVA) showed significant differences between all 3 tested groups with F-statistic (19.96) and P value (<0.005). Coefficient of variation of the NHC, AHC, and DGC groups were 14.8%, 20.2%, and 27.5%, respectively. Posthoc tests showed that glucose response was significantly lower in the NHC group at all time points (P <0.005) compared to the AHC and DGC groups. In conclusion, natural honey stabilizes physiological glycemic response with rebound recovery of PGL.

Original languageEnglish
JournalJournal of Food Science
Volume73
Issue number7
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Sep 2008
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Honey
honey
Glucose
glucose
glucose tolerance
Glucose Tolerance Test
blood glucose
fasting
Blood Glucose
mouth
Fasting
Analysis of Variance
Healthy Volunteers
statistics
analysis of variance
Body Weight
body weight

Keywords

  • Diabetes
  • Glucose metabolism
  • Glycemic index
  • Nutraceutical
  • Nutrition

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Food Science

Cite this

Natural honey modulates physiological glycemic response compared to simulated honey and D-glucose. / Ahmad, A.; Azim, M. K.; Mohammed Ahmed Hassan, Osman Mesaik; Nazimuddin; Khan, R. A.

In: Journal of Food Science, Vol. 73, No. 7, 09.2008.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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abstract = "The present study is undertaken to find out the relative glycemic tolerance of natural honey compared with simulated honey and D-glucose using oral glucose tolerance tested up to 180 min. Twenty-six healthy human subjects with mean age of 28.6 ± 9.3 y were randomly divided into 3 groups, that is, natural honey consumers (NHC; n = 13), simulated honey consumers (AHC; n = 6), and D-glucose consumers (DGC; n = 7). After recording fasting blood glucose, the participants consumed either natural honey or simulated honey or D-glucose (1g/kg body weight). Subsequently, additional plasma glucose levels (PGLs) were recorded at 60, 120, and 180 min. At 60 min, DGC and AHC group members exhibited similar PGL elevation (that is, 52{\%} and 47{\%}, respectively) compared to NHC group with only 20{\%} increment. On the other hand, after 180 min, 20{\%} decrease in PGL was observed in the DGC group compared to 9.75{\%} reduction in the NHC group. These observations are primarily in line with earlier studies. Results analyzed by one-way analysis of variance (ANOVA) showed significant differences between all 3 tested groups with F-statistic (19.96) and P value (<0.005). Coefficient of variation of the NHC, AHC, and DGC groups were 14.8{\%}, 20.2{\%}, and 27.5{\%}, respectively. Posthoc tests showed that glucose response was significantly lower in the NHC group at all time points (P <0.005) compared to the AHC and DGC groups. In conclusion, natural honey stabilizes physiological glycemic response with rebound recovery of PGL.",
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