Nanostructural colouration in Malaysian plants: Lessons for biomimetics and biomaterials

S. Zaleha M Diah, Salmah B. Karman, Ille C. Gebeshuber

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

    5 Citations (Scopus)

    Abstract

    Plant tissues include leaves, flower petals, and fruits. These can provide us with variety of design inspirations. Biomimetics allows us to learn from nature and transfer the knowledge we gain from studying sophisticated and amazing biological structures, materials and processes to engineering and the arts. The microstructures of morphology and anatomy of plant tissue have potential applications in technology through bioinspired design, which can mimic the properties found in nature or use them as inspiration for alternative applications. Many applications have been developed as a result of studying physical properties of plant tissues. Structural colours, for example, have been applied in the design of thin films both with regard to single or multilayer thin film interference, scattering, and diffraction gratings. Iridescent, metallic, or greyish colouration found naturally in plants is the result of physical structures or physical effects and not pigmentation. Phenotypical appearance of plants with structural colouration in tropical Malaysia is correlated with environmental parameters such as location (shady understory rainforest, sunny conditions) and altitude (highlands, lowlands). Various examples of bioinspired technical innovations with structural colours highlight the importance of inspiration by structural colours in living nature.

    Original languageEnglish
    Article number878409
    JournalJournal of Nanomaterials
    Volume2014
    DOIs
    Publication statusPublished - 2014

    Fingerprint

    Biomimetics
    Biocompatible Materials
    Biomaterials
    Tissue
    Color
    Thin films
    Multilayer films
    Diffraction gratings
    Fruits
    Physical properties
    Innovation
    Scattering
    Microstructure

    ASJC Scopus subject areas

    • Materials Science(all)

    Cite this

    Nanostructural colouration in Malaysian plants : Lessons for biomimetics and biomaterials. / Diah, S. Zaleha M; Karman, Salmah B.; Gebeshuber, Ille C.

    In: Journal of Nanomaterials, Vol. 2014, 878409, 2014.

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

    Diah, S. Zaleha M ; Karman, Salmah B. ; Gebeshuber, Ille C. / Nanostructural colouration in Malaysian plants : Lessons for biomimetics and biomaterials. In: Journal of Nanomaterials. 2014 ; Vol. 2014.
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