Naloxone and vitamin E block stress-induced reduction of locomotor activity and elevation of plasma corticosterone

O. Ainsah, Nabishah Mohamad, C. B. Osman, B. A K Khalid

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

16 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Normal rats, on being repetitively stressed by being restrained in a tight container for two hours, had higher levels of plasma corticosterone compared to pre stress values. These rats also reacted to the stress by a behavioral response in which there was marked decrease in locomotor activity assessed by the open field test (pre stress: 71.3 ± 2.6 squares crossed versus post stress: 14.3 ± 2.5 squares crossed) by counting the number of squares entered by the rat over 5 minutes. By the 6th to 7th exposures to the repetitive stress, the rats adapted to the stress and had normal plasma corticosterone levels and locomotor activity scores comparable to the pre stress values. These responses to stress were completely blocked by the administration of 0.32 μg/100 g BW of naloxone i.p at 10 minutes prior to the stress. In rats fed with rat chow supplemented with 90 mg/kg rat chow or 150 mg/kg rat chow of vitamin E, there was significant reduction of the plasma corticosterone levels and improvement in the locomotor activity. Stress thus caused opioid mediated increase in plasma corticosterone and reduction in locomotor activity which could be blocked by naloxone. These stress responses probably also involved generation of oxygen free radicals which were scavenged by the vitamin E, thus reducing the effects of repetitive stress on locomotor activity and serum corticosterone levels.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)462-467
Number of pages6
JournalExperimental and Clinical Endocrinology and Diabetes
Volume107
Issue number7
Publication statusPublished - 1999

Fingerprint

Locomotion
Naloxone
Corticosterone
Vitamin E
Exercise Test
Opioid Analgesics
Free Radicals
Reactive Oxygen Species
Serum

Keywords

  • Locomotor activity
  • Plasma corticosterone
  • Restraint stress
  • Vitamin e

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Endocrinology
  • Endocrinology, Diabetes and Metabolism

Cite this

Naloxone and vitamin E block stress-induced reduction of locomotor activity and elevation of plasma corticosterone. / Ainsah, O.; Mohamad, Nabishah; Osman, C. B.; Khalid, B. A K.

In: Experimental and Clinical Endocrinology and Diabetes, Vol. 107, No. 7, 1999, p. 462-467.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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