Muslim women's memoirs

Disclosing violence or reproducing Islamophobia?

Esmaeil Zeiny Jelodar, Noraini Md. Yusof, Ruzy Suliza Hashim

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

1 Citation (Scopus)

Abstract

As an upshot of 9/11, the literary market in the West saw a proliferation in writings by and about Muslim women. Many of these works are memoirs which focus on Islam, a patriarchal society, and the state's oppression on women. These Muslim women memoirists take the western readers into a journey of unseen and unheard events of their private lives which is apparently of great interest for the westerners. Some of these memoirs, which reveal the atrocities and hardships of living in a Muslim society under oppressive Islamic regimes, are fraught with stereotypes and generalizations. Utilizing Gillian Whitlock's theory of 'soft weapons' and studying the concept of Islam in Marjane Satrapi's Persepolis: The Story of a Childhood (2003), we argue that some of these Muslim life narratives are manipulated to meet political demands of the West through creating Islamophobia.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)215-223
Number of pages9
JournalAsian Social Science
Volume10
Issue number14
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 24 Jun 2014

Fingerprint

Muslim
violence
Islam
oppression
weapon
proliferation
privacy
stereotype
childhood
regime
narrative
islamophobia
Islamophobia
Muslims
Memoir
Muslim Women
event
market
Society
Patriarchal Society

Keywords

  • Imperialism
  • Islamophobia
  • Muslim memoirs
  • Oppression
  • Women

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Economics, Econometrics and Finance(all)
  • Social Sciences(all)
  • Arts and Humanities(all)

Cite this

Muslim women's memoirs : Disclosing violence or reproducing Islamophobia? / Jelodar, Esmaeil Zeiny; Md. Yusof, Noraini; Hashim, Ruzy Suliza.

In: Asian Social Science, Vol. 10, No. 14, 24.06.2014, p. 215-223.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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