Multiple exposure interferometric lithography-a novel approach to nanometer structures

Xiaolan Chen, Saleem H. Zaidi, S. R J Brueck

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingChapter

2 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Trends in both integrated circuit and flat-panel display manufacturing technologies require improvements in nanoscale lithography. In both fields, there is increasing demand for a cost-effective lithographic technique that can produce large fields (to approx.45 cm diagonal for displays) of nanoscale structures [the semiconductor industry roadmap calls for leading-edge manufacturing at 180 nm (in 2001) and 90 nm (in 2007)]. Imaging optical lithographic techniques are approaching fundamental limits in resolution and depth-of-field at these dimensions. Interferometric lithography, in contrast, provides a very simple and inexpensive technique that features essentially unlimited depth-of-field patterns with critical dimensions (CD) as small as λ/4 over very large areas. Using inexpensive optics and existing laser sources and photoresists, interferometric lithography can extend to well beyond the horizons of the current industry roadmaps.

Original languageEnglish
Title of host publicationConference Proceedings - Lasers and Electro-Optics Society Annual Meeting-LEOS
PublisherIEEE
Pages390-391
Number of pages2
Publication statusPublished - 1996
Externally publishedYes
EventProceedings of the 1996 Conference on Lasers and Electro-Optics, CLEO'96 - Anaheim, CA, USA
Duration: 2 Jun 19967 Jun 1996

Other

OtherProceedings of the 1996 Conference on Lasers and Electro-Optics, CLEO'96
CityAnaheim, CA, USA
Period2/6/967/6/96

Fingerprint

Lithography
Flat panel displays
Photoresists
Integrated circuits
Light sources
Optics
Industry
Display devices
Semiconductor materials
Imaging techniques
Lasers
Costs

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Control and Systems Engineering
  • Electrical and Electronic Engineering
  • Industrial and Manufacturing Engineering

Cite this

Chen, X., Zaidi, S. H., & Brueck, S. R. J. (1996). Multiple exposure interferometric lithography-a novel approach to nanometer structures. In Conference Proceedings - Lasers and Electro-Optics Society Annual Meeting-LEOS (pp. 390-391). IEEE.

Multiple exposure interferometric lithography-a novel approach to nanometer structures. / Chen, Xiaolan; Zaidi, Saleem H.; Brueck, S. R J.

Conference Proceedings - Lasers and Electro-Optics Society Annual Meeting-LEOS. IEEE, 1996. p. 390-391.

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingChapter

Chen, X, Zaidi, SH & Brueck, SRJ 1996, Multiple exposure interferometric lithography-a novel approach to nanometer structures. in Conference Proceedings - Lasers and Electro-Optics Society Annual Meeting-LEOS. IEEE, pp. 390-391, Proceedings of the 1996 Conference on Lasers and Electro-Optics, CLEO'96, Anaheim, CA, USA, 2/6/96.
Chen X, Zaidi SH, Brueck SRJ. Multiple exposure interferometric lithography-a novel approach to nanometer structures. In Conference Proceedings - Lasers and Electro-Optics Society Annual Meeting-LEOS. IEEE. 1996. p. 390-391
Chen, Xiaolan ; Zaidi, Saleem H. ; Brueck, S. R J. / Multiple exposure interferometric lithography-a novel approach to nanometer structures. Conference Proceedings - Lasers and Electro-Optics Society Annual Meeting-LEOS. IEEE, 1996. pp. 390-391
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