More Acanthamoeba keratitis cases in Malaysia

Mohamed Kamel Abdul Ghani, Hamzah Haniza, Anisah Nordin, Suboh Yusof, Hanum Faridah, Norhayati Moktar, Ahmad Norazah

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

8 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Introduction: Acanthamoeba keratitis is a rare but one of the most severe and potentially sight threatening ocular parasitic infectious diseases. In Malaysia, the first case of Acanthamoeba keratitis was reported in 1995 involving a woman contact lens wearer. Subsequently more cases were seen, though not reported, but the true incidence is not known since it is not a reportable disease. Materials and Methods: Between June 2002 and December 2002 a total of 44 confirmed cases of keratitis with corneal ulcer were diagnosed by ophthalmologists and their corneal scrapings were sent for culture. The participating hospitals were Hospital UKM (HUKM), Kuala Lumpur Hospital (HKL), The Tun Hussein Onn Eye Hospital (HTHO) and a private clinic. Results: Four (9.1%) of the 44 cases were found to be culture positive for Acanthamoeba. All 4 cases were women aged between 23-47 years and 3 of them wore contact lenses. Except one, three of them were diagnosed late (after more than 1 month of the initial symptoms) indicating that it was one of the conditions whose diagnosis is most commonly missed at initial presentation. Contact lens wear and improper contact lens hygiene seemed to be important risk factors in the development of this condition. Conclusions: It is our impression that Acanthamoeba keratitis is by no means so rare in Malaysia. As it is now seen frequently enough, it should be considered as part of the differential diagnosis of most cases of presumed microbial keratitis especially if the patient is a contact lens wearer.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)7-9
Number of pages3
JournalInternational Medical Journal
Volume12
Issue number1
Publication statusPublished - Mar 2005

Fingerprint

Acanthamoeba Keratitis
Malaysia
Contact Lenses
Keratitis
Acanthamoeba
Corneal Ulcer
Private Hospitals
Parasitic Diseases
Hygiene
Communicable Diseases
Differential Diagnosis
Incidence

Keywords

  • Acanthamoeba keratitis
  • Contact lens
  • Malaysia

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Medicine(all)

Cite this

More Acanthamoeba keratitis cases in Malaysia. / Abdul Ghani, Mohamed Kamel; Haniza, Hamzah; Nordin, Anisah; Yusof, Suboh; Faridah, Hanum; Moktar, Norhayati; Norazah, Ahmad.

In: International Medical Journal, Vol. 12, No. 1, 03.2005, p. 7-9.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abdul Ghani, MK, Haniza, H, Nordin, A, Yusof, S, Faridah, H, Moktar, N & Norazah, A 2005, 'More Acanthamoeba keratitis cases in Malaysia', International Medical Journal, vol. 12, no. 1, pp. 7-9.
Abdul Ghani, Mohamed Kamel ; Haniza, Hamzah ; Nordin, Anisah ; Yusof, Suboh ; Faridah, Hanum ; Moktar, Norhayati ; Norazah, Ahmad. / More Acanthamoeba keratitis cases in Malaysia. In: International Medical Journal. 2005 ; Vol. 12, No. 1. pp. 7-9.
@article{c155e350330c4a7083193fbed96b3c95,
title = "More Acanthamoeba keratitis cases in Malaysia",
abstract = "Introduction: Acanthamoeba keratitis is a rare but one of the most severe and potentially sight threatening ocular parasitic infectious diseases. In Malaysia, the first case of Acanthamoeba keratitis was reported in 1995 involving a woman contact lens wearer. Subsequently more cases were seen, though not reported, but the true incidence is not known since it is not a reportable disease. Materials and Methods: Between June 2002 and December 2002 a total of 44 confirmed cases of keratitis with corneal ulcer were diagnosed by ophthalmologists and their corneal scrapings were sent for culture. The participating hospitals were Hospital UKM (HUKM), Kuala Lumpur Hospital (HKL), The Tun Hussein Onn Eye Hospital (HTHO) and a private clinic. Results: Four (9.1{\%}) of the 44 cases were found to be culture positive for Acanthamoeba. All 4 cases were women aged between 23-47 years and 3 of them wore contact lenses. Except one, three of them were diagnosed late (after more than 1 month of the initial symptoms) indicating that it was one of the conditions whose diagnosis is most commonly missed at initial presentation. Contact lens wear and improper contact lens hygiene seemed to be important risk factors in the development of this condition. Conclusions: It is our impression that Acanthamoeba keratitis is by no means so rare in Malaysia. As it is now seen frequently enough, it should be considered as part of the differential diagnosis of most cases of presumed microbial keratitis especially if the patient is a contact lens wearer.",
keywords = "Acanthamoeba keratitis, Contact lens, Malaysia",
author = "{Abdul Ghani}, {Mohamed Kamel} and Hamzah Haniza and Anisah Nordin and Suboh Yusof and Hanum Faridah and Norhayati Moktar and Ahmad Norazah",
year = "2005",
month = "3",
language = "English",
volume = "12",
pages = "7--9",
journal = "International Medical Journal",
issn = "1341-2051",
publisher = "Japan International Cultural Exchange Foundation",
number = "1",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - More Acanthamoeba keratitis cases in Malaysia

AU - Abdul Ghani, Mohamed Kamel

AU - Haniza, Hamzah

AU - Nordin, Anisah

AU - Yusof, Suboh

AU - Faridah, Hanum

AU - Moktar, Norhayati

AU - Norazah, Ahmad

PY - 2005/3

Y1 - 2005/3

N2 - Introduction: Acanthamoeba keratitis is a rare but one of the most severe and potentially sight threatening ocular parasitic infectious diseases. In Malaysia, the first case of Acanthamoeba keratitis was reported in 1995 involving a woman contact lens wearer. Subsequently more cases were seen, though not reported, but the true incidence is not known since it is not a reportable disease. Materials and Methods: Between June 2002 and December 2002 a total of 44 confirmed cases of keratitis with corneal ulcer were diagnosed by ophthalmologists and their corneal scrapings were sent for culture. The participating hospitals were Hospital UKM (HUKM), Kuala Lumpur Hospital (HKL), The Tun Hussein Onn Eye Hospital (HTHO) and a private clinic. Results: Four (9.1%) of the 44 cases were found to be culture positive for Acanthamoeba. All 4 cases were women aged between 23-47 years and 3 of them wore contact lenses. Except one, three of them were diagnosed late (after more than 1 month of the initial symptoms) indicating that it was one of the conditions whose diagnosis is most commonly missed at initial presentation. Contact lens wear and improper contact lens hygiene seemed to be important risk factors in the development of this condition. Conclusions: It is our impression that Acanthamoeba keratitis is by no means so rare in Malaysia. As it is now seen frequently enough, it should be considered as part of the differential diagnosis of most cases of presumed microbial keratitis especially if the patient is a contact lens wearer.

AB - Introduction: Acanthamoeba keratitis is a rare but one of the most severe and potentially sight threatening ocular parasitic infectious diseases. In Malaysia, the first case of Acanthamoeba keratitis was reported in 1995 involving a woman contact lens wearer. Subsequently more cases were seen, though not reported, but the true incidence is not known since it is not a reportable disease. Materials and Methods: Between June 2002 and December 2002 a total of 44 confirmed cases of keratitis with corneal ulcer were diagnosed by ophthalmologists and their corneal scrapings were sent for culture. The participating hospitals were Hospital UKM (HUKM), Kuala Lumpur Hospital (HKL), The Tun Hussein Onn Eye Hospital (HTHO) and a private clinic. Results: Four (9.1%) of the 44 cases were found to be culture positive for Acanthamoeba. All 4 cases were women aged between 23-47 years and 3 of them wore contact lenses. Except one, three of them were diagnosed late (after more than 1 month of the initial symptoms) indicating that it was one of the conditions whose diagnosis is most commonly missed at initial presentation. Contact lens wear and improper contact lens hygiene seemed to be important risk factors in the development of this condition. Conclusions: It is our impression that Acanthamoeba keratitis is by no means so rare in Malaysia. As it is now seen frequently enough, it should be considered as part of the differential diagnosis of most cases of presumed microbial keratitis especially if the patient is a contact lens wearer.

KW - Acanthamoeba keratitis

KW - Contact lens

KW - Malaysia

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=18244391966&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=18244391966&partnerID=8YFLogxK

M3 - Article

VL - 12

SP - 7

EP - 9

JO - International Medical Journal

JF - International Medical Journal

SN - 1341-2051

IS - 1

ER -