Monitoring extremely slow rolling element bearings

Part I

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

38 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The most established technique for monitoring the integrity of rolling element bearings is vibration analysis. However, at extremely slow rotational speeds of less than 2rpm, monitoring the health of rolling element bearings is fraught with difficulty since conventional vibration acquisition equipment is not capable of measuring the fundamental frequency of operation. Furthermore, component distress at such low speeds does not necessarily show an obvious change in vibration signature. This paper presents a study of high frequency acoustic emission (AE) as a means of detecting early stages of loss of mechanical integrity in extremely slow rolling element bearings, in this instance 1.1 rpm. The mechanism for AE generation was the rubbing action of mating components that were experiencing loss of mechanical integrity within the bearing, for instance, the rubbing action of a roller on a damaged outer race. Investigations detailed were centred on a bearing test-rig onto which localised surface defects were seeded by spark erosion. In addition, evidence of successful application on an operational bearing is presented in part II of this paper.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)349-358
Number of pages10
JournalNDT and E International
Volume35
Issue number6
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Sep 2002

Fingerprint

Bearings (structural)
Monitoring
integrity
acoustic emission
Acoustic emissions
vibration
rollers
Surface defects
Vibration analysis
surface defects
sparks
Electric sparks
low speed
health
erosion
Erosion
acquisition
signatures
Health

Keywords

  • Acoustic emission
  • Auto-regressive coefficients
  • Clustering
  • Rolling element bearings
  • Slow rotational speed
  • Spark erosion

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Engineering(all)
  • Mechanical Engineering

Cite this

Monitoring extremely slow rolling element bearings : Part I. / Jamaludin, Nordin; Mba, D.

In: NDT and E International, Vol. 35, No. 6, 09.2002, p. 349-358.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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