Molecular signatures of human regulatory T cells in colorectal cancer and polyps

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

4 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Regulatory T cells (Tregs), a subset of CD4+ or CD8+ T cells, play a pivotal role in regulating immune homeostasis. An increase in Tregs was reported in many tumors to be associated with immune suppression and evasion in cancer patients. Despite the importance of Tregs, the molecular signatures that contributed to their pathophysiological relevance remain poorly understood and controversial. In this study, we explored the gene expression profiles in Tregs derived from patients with colorectal cancer [colorectal carcinoma (CRC), n = 15], colorectal polyps (P, n = 15), and in healthy volunteers (N, n = 15). Tregs were analyzed using CD4+CD25+CD127lowFoxP3+ antibody markers. Gene expression profiling analysis leads to the identification of 61 and 66 immune-related genes in Tregs derived from CRC and P patients, respectively, but not in N-derived Treg samples. Of these, 30 genes were differentially expressed both in CRC- and P-derived Tregs when compared to N-derived Tregs. Most of the identified genes were involved in cytokine/chemokine mediators of inflammation, chemokine receptor, lymphocyte activation, and T cell receptor (TCR) signaling pathways. This study highlights some of the molecular signatures that may affect Tregs' expansion and possible suppression of function in cancer development. Our findings may provide a better understanding of the immunomodulatory nature of Tregs and could, therefore, open up new avenues in immunotherapy.

Original languageEnglish
Article number620
JournalFrontiers in Immunology
Volume8
Issue numberMAY
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 30 May 2017

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Regulatory T-Lymphocytes
Polyps
Colorectal Neoplasms
Genes
Immune Evasion
Inflammation Mediators
Neoplasms
Chemokine Receptors
Gene Expression Profiling
Lymphocyte Activation
T-Cell Antigen Receptor
Transcriptome
Chemokines
Immunotherapy
Healthy Volunteers
Homeostasis
Cytokines
T-Lymphocytes
Antibodies

Keywords

  • Colorectal cancer
  • Gene expression
  • Immune suppression
  • Interleukin
  • Regulatory T cells

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Immunology and Allergy
  • Immunology

Cite this

Molecular signatures of human regulatory T cells in colorectal cancer and polyps. / Johdi, Nor Adzimah; Ait-Tahar, Kamel; Sagap, Ismail; A. Jamal, A. Rahman.

In: Frontiers in Immunology, Vol. 8, No. MAY, 620, 30.05.2017.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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