Molecular epidemiology of blastocystosis in Malaysia: Does seasonal variation play an important role in determining the distribution and risk factors of Blastocystis subtype infections in the Aboriginal community?

Samseh Abdullah Noradilah, Norhayati Moktar, Tengku Shahrul Anuar, Ii Li Lee, Fatmah Md Salleh, Siti Nor Azreen Abdul Manap, Noor Shazleen Husnie Mohd Mohtar, Syed Muhamad Azrul, Wan Omar Abdullah, Anisah Nordin, Syamsa Rizal Abdullah

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

7 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Background: Alternating wet and dry seasons may play an important role in the acquisition and distribution of Blastocystis subtype infection in the tropics. This cross-sectional study was therefore conducted to provide the prevalence of Blastocystis and to determine the potential risk factors associated with each subtype during the wet and dry seasons in the Aboriginal community, Pahang, Malaysia. Methods: A total of 473 faecal samples were collected: 256 (54.1%) and 217 (45.9%) samples were obtained during the wet (October-November 2014) and the dry season (June 2015), respectively. All fresh faecal samples were subjected to molecular analysis for subtype and allele identification. Results: Of the 473 samples, 42.6% and 37.8% were positive for Blastocystis ST1, ST2, ST3 and ST4 during wet and dry seasons, respectively. Prevalence of Blastocystis ST1 was significantly higher during the wet season compared to the dry season (Z = 2.146, P < 0.05). Analysis of the association of each Blastocystis subtype with socioeconomic characteristics showed the presence of other family members infected with Blastocystis ST3 and the use of stored river water for domestic activities were the significant risk factors for Blastocystis ST3 infections during both seasons. Untreated water supply and low monthly household income (less or equal to RM 500) were the other significant risk factors for Blastocystis ST3 infections during wet and dry season, respectively. The presence of other family members with Blastocystis ST1 and ST2 was the only significant risk factor associated with ST1 and ST2 infections during both seasons. We hypothesise that transmission of Blastocystis ST1, ST2 and ST3 occurred from person to person during both seasons. The waterborne transmission was also identified as a mode of transmission of Blastocystis ST3. Conclusion: The significant risk factors identified in this study were important in the dynamic transmission of Blastocystis infections during both seasons. Provision of treated water supply and health education are affirmative actions to be taken to control Blastocystis infections in this community.

Original languageEnglish
Article number360
JournalParasites and Vectors
Volume10
Issue number1
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 31 Jul 2017

Fingerprint

Blastocystis Infections
Blastocystis
Molecular Epidemiology
Malaysia
Water Supply
Health Education
Rivers

Keywords

  • Blastocystis
  • Person to person transmission
  • Risk factors
  • Seasonal variations
  • Water-borne transmission

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Parasitology
  • Infectious Diseases

Cite this

Molecular epidemiology of blastocystosis in Malaysia : Does seasonal variation play an important role in determining the distribution and risk factors of Blastocystis subtype infections in the Aboriginal community? / Noradilah, Samseh Abdullah; Moktar, Norhayati; Anuar, Tengku Shahrul; Lee, Ii Li; Salleh, Fatmah Md; Manap, Siti Nor Azreen Abdul; Mohtar, Noor Shazleen Husnie Mohd; Azrul, Syed Muhamad; Abdullah, Wan Omar; Nordin, Anisah; Abdullah, Syamsa Rizal.

In: Parasites and Vectors, Vol. 10, No. 1, 360, 31.07.2017.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Noradilah, Samseh Abdullah ; Moktar, Norhayati ; Anuar, Tengku Shahrul ; Lee, Ii Li ; Salleh, Fatmah Md ; Manap, Siti Nor Azreen Abdul ; Mohtar, Noor Shazleen Husnie Mohd ; Azrul, Syed Muhamad ; Abdullah, Wan Omar ; Nordin, Anisah ; Abdullah, Syamsa Rizal. / Molecular epidemiology of blastocystosis in Malaysia : Does seasonal variation play an important role in determining the distribution and risk factors of Blastocystis subtype infections in the Aboriginal community?. In: Parasites and Vectors. 2017 ; Vol. 10, No. 1.
@article{3c63dcbd2b114110b4d28c9411fbd233,
title = "Molecular epidemiology of blastocystosis in Malaysia: Does seasonal variation play an important role in determining the distribution and risk factors of Blastocystis subtype infections in the Aboriginal community?",
abstract = "Background: Alternating wet and dry seasons may play an important role in the acquisition and distribution of Blastocystis subtype infection in the tropics. This cross-sectional study was therefore conducted to provide the prevalence of Blastocystis and to determine the potential risk factors associated with each subtype during the wet and dry seasons in the Aboriginal community, Pahang, Malaysia. Methods: A total of 473 faecal samples were collected: 256 (54.1{\%}) and 217 (45.9{\%}) samples were obtained during the wet (October-November 2014) and the dry season (June 2015), respectively. All fresh faecal samples were subjected to molecular analysis for subtype and allele identification. Results: Of the 473 samples, 42.6{\%} and 37.8{\%} were positive for Blastocystis ST1, ST2, ST3 and ST4 during wet and dry seasons, respectively. Prevalence of Blastocystis ST1 was significantly higher during the wet season compared to the dry season (Z = 2.146, P < 0.05). Analysis of the association of each Blastocystis subtype with socioeconomic characteristics showed the presence of other family members infected with Blastocystis ST3 and the use of stored river water for domestic activities were the significant risk factors for Blastocystis ST3 infections during both seasons. Untreated water supply and low monthly household income (less or equal to RM 500) were the other significant risk factors for Blastocystis ST3 infections during wet and dry season, respectively. The presence of other family members with Blastocystis ST1 and ST2 was the only significant risk factor associated with ST1 and ST2 infections during both seasons. We hypothesise that transmission of Blastocystis ST1, ST2 and ST3 occurred from person to person during both seasons. The waterborne transmission was also identified as a mode of transmission of Blastocystis ST3. Conclusion: The significant risk factors identified in this study were important in the dynamic transmission of Blastocystis infections during both seasons. Provision of treated water supply and health education are affirmative actions to be taken to control Blastocystis infections in this community.",
keywords = "Blastocystis, Person to person transmission, Risk factors, Seasonal variations, Water-borne transmission",
author = "Noradilah, {Samseh Abdullah} and Norhayati Moktar and Anuar, {Tengku Shahrul} and Lee, {Ii Li} and Salleh, {Fatmah Md} and Manap, {Siti Nor Azreen Abdul} and Mohtar, {Noor Shazleen Husnie Mohd} and Azrul, {Syed Muhamad} and Abdullah, {Wan Omar} and Anisah Nordin and Abdullah, {Syamsa Rizal}",
year = "2017",
month = "7",
day = "31",
doi = "10.1186/s13071-017-2294-2",
language = "English",
volume = "10",
journal = "Parasites and Vectors",
issn = "1756-3305",
publisher = "BioMed Central",
number = "1",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Molecular epidemiology of blastocystosis in Malaysia

T2 - Does seasonal variation play an important role in determining the distribution and risk factors of Blastocystis subtype infections in the Aboriginal community?

AU - Noradilah, Samseh Abdullah

AU - Moktar, Norhayati

AU - Anuar, Tengku Shahrul

AU - Lee, Ii Li

AU - Salleh, Fatmah Md

AU - Manap, Siti Nor Azreen Abdul

AU - Mohtar, Noor Shazleen Husnie Mohd

AU - Azrul, Syed Muhamad

AU - Abdullah, Wan Omar

AU - Nordin, Anisah

AU - Abdullah, Syamsa Rizal

PY - 2017/7/31

Y1 - 2017/7/31

N2 - Background: Alternating wet and dry seasons may play an important role in the acquisition and distribution of Blastocystis subtype infection in the tropics. This cross-sectional study was therefore conducted to provide the prevalence of Blastocystis and to determine the potential risk factors associated with each subtype during the wet and dry seasons in the Aboriginal community, Pahang, Malaysia. Methods: A total of 473 faecal samples were collected: 256 (54.1%) and 217 (45.9%) samples were obtained during the wet (October-November 2014) and the dry season (June 2015), respectively. All fresh faecal samples were subjected to molecular analysis for subtype and allele identification. Results: Of the 473 samples, 42.6% and 37.8% were positive for Blastocystis ST1, ST2, ST3 and ST4 during wet and dry seasons, respectively. Prevalence of Blastocystis ST1 was significantly higher during the wet season compared to the dry season (Z = 2.146, P < 0.05). Analysis of the association of each Blastocystis subtype with socioeconomic characteristics showed the presence of other family members infected with Blastocystis ST3 and the use of stored river water for domestic activities were the significant risk factors for Blastocystis ST3 infections during both seasons. Untreated water supply and low monthly household income (less or equal to RM 500) were the other significant risk factors for Blastocystis ST3 infections during wet and dry season, respectively. The presence of other family members with Blastocystis ST1 and ST2 was the only significant risk factor associated with ST1 and ST2 infections during both seasons. We hypothesise that transmission of Blastocystis ST1, ST2 and ST3 occurred from person to person during both seasons. The waterborne transmission was also identified as a mode of transmission of Blastocystis ST3. Conclusion: The significant risk factors identified in this study were important in the dynamic transmission of Blastocystis infections during both seasons. Provision of treated water supply and health education are affirmative actions to be taken to control Blastocystis infections in this community.

AB - Background: Alternating wet and dry seasons may play an important role in the acquisition and distribution of Blastocystis subtype infection in the tropics. This cross-sectional study was therefore conducted to provide the prevalence of Blastocystis and to determine the potential risk factors associated with each subtype during the wet and dry seasons in the Aboriginal community, Pahang, Malaysia. Methods: A total of 473 faecal samples were collected: 256 (54.1%) and 217 (45.9%) samples were obtained during the wet (October-November 2014) and the dry season (June 2015), respectively. All fresh faecal samples were subjected to molecular analysis for subtype and allele identification. Results: Of the 473 samples, 42.6% and 37.8% were positive for Blastocystis ST1, ST2, ST3 and ST4 during wet and dry seasons, respectively. Prevalence of Blastocystis ST1 was significantly higher during the wet season compared to the dry season (Z = 2.146, P < 0.05). Analysis of the association of each Blastocystis subtype with socioeconomic characteristics showed the presence of other family members infected with Blastocystis ST3 and the use of stored river water for domestic activities were the significant risk factors for Blastocystis ST3 infections during both seasons. Untreated water supply and low monthly household income (less or equal to RM 500) were the other significant risk factors for Blastocystis ST3 infections during wet and dry season, respectively. The presence of other family members with Blastocystis ST1 and ST2 was the only significant risk factor associated with ST1 and ST2 infections during both seasons. We hypothesise that transmission of Blastocystis ST1, ST2 and ST3 occurred from person to person during both seasons. The waterborne transmission was also identified as a mode of transmission of Blastocystis ST3. Conclusion: The significant risk factors identified in this study were important in the dynamic transmission of Blastocystis infections during both seasons. Provision of treated water supply and health education are affirmative actions to be taken to control Blastocystis infections in this community.

KW - Blastocystis

KW - Person to person transmission

KW - Risk factors

KW - Seasonal variations

KW - Water-borne transmission

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=85026503521&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=85026503521&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1186/s13071-017-2294-2

DO - 10.1186/s13071-017-2294-2

M3 - Article

C2 - 28760145

AN - SCOPUS:85026503521

VL - 10

JO - Parasites and Vectors

JF - Parasites and Vectors

SN - 1756-3305

IS - 1

M1 - 360

ER -