Molecular characterization of Trichuris species isolated from humans, dogs and cats in rural community Peninsular Malaysia

Norashikin Mohd-Shaharuddin, Yvonne Ai Lian Lim, Nur Amirah Hassan, Sheila Nathan, Romano Ngui

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

1 Citation (Scopus)

Abstract

Trichuris trichiura (whipworm) are soil-transmitted helminths (STHs) that causing trichuriasis in human. Trichuris vulpis, a canine whipworm has also been reported occasionally in humans. However, an overlapping dimension in the morphology and due to limited external characters between both species may lead to the potential for misidentification. Although there has been an extensive study on the distribution of whipworm in both human and animal hosts, little is known about the molecular epidemiology of Trichuris species in both hosts. To investigate to characterize the whipworm species and to determine the genetic relationship between species infecting both humans and animals, we sequenced the small subunit ribosomal RNA (SSU rRNA) regions of Trichuris egg isolated from humans, dogs and cats in a rural community in Malaysia. A total of 524 fresh fecal samples were collected from humans and animals. The overall prevalence of Trichuris was 59.9% as determined by microscopy examination. The molecular analysis showed that 98.7% were identified as T. trichiura in the human fecal sample. Interestingly, 1.3% were identified as T. vulpis. As for animal fecal sample, 56.8% and 43.2% were identified as T. trichiura and T. vulpis, respectively. Phylogenetic and sequence analysis demonstrated that T. trichiura isolates were genetically distinct from T. vulpis isolates from both hosts. This finding implies that companion animals can be a reservoir and mechanical transmitter for T. trichiura infection in human and also highlighting the possible zoonotic potential of T. vulpis. This finding may also suggest that cross-transmission between humans and animal hosts in sympatric setting may be a source of infection in both hosts. More studies are needed to better understand the transmission dynamic and public health significance of Trichuris infection in both hosts.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)269-272
Number of pages4
JournalActa Tropica
Volume190
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 1 Feb 2019

Fingerprint

Trichuris
Malaysia
rural communities
Rural Population
Trichuris trichiura
Cats
Trichuris vulpis
Dogs
cats
dogs
animals
trichuriasis
infection
Trichuriasis
Infection
Small Ribosome Subunits
molecular epidemiology
Molecular Epidemiology
Helminths
Pets

Keywords

  • Human
  • Pet ownership
  • SSU ribosomal RNA
  • Trichuris trichiura
  • Trichuris vulpis

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Parasitology
  • veterinary (miscalleneous)
  • Insect Science
  • Infectious Diseases

Cite this

Molecular characterization of Trichuris species isolated from humans, dogs and cats in rural community Peninsular Malaysia. / Mohd-Shaharuddin, Norashikin; Lim, Yvonne Ai Lian; Hassan, Nur Amirah; Nathan, Sheila; Ngui, Romano.

In: Acta Tropica, Vol. 190, 01.02.2019, p. 269-272.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Mohd-Shaharuddin, Norashikin ; Lim, Yvonne Ai Lian ; Hassan, Nur Amirah ; Nathan, Sheila ; Ngui, Romano. / Molecular characterization of Trichuris species isolated from humans, dogs and cats in rural community Peninsular Malaysia. In: Acta Tropica. 2019 ; Vol. 190. pp. 269-272.
@article{fefe65859fae479fa2f19962c891efd8,
title = "Molecular characterization of Trichuris species isolated from humans, dogs and cats in rural community Peninsular Malaysia",
abstract = "Trichuris trichiura (whipworm) are soil-transmitted helminths (STHs) that causing trichuriasis in human. Trichuris vulpis, a canine whipworm has also been reported occasionally in humans. However, an overlapping dimension in the morphology and due to limited external characters between both species may lead to the potential for misidentification. Although there has been an extensive study on the distribution of whipworm in both human and animal hosts, little is known about the molecular epidemiology of Trichuris species in both hosts. To investigate to characterize the whipworm species and to determine the genetic relationship between species infecting both humans and animals, we sequenced the small subunit ribosomal RNA (SSU rRNA) regions of Trichuris egg isolated from humans, dogs and cats in a rural community in Malaysia. A total of 524 fresh fecal samples were collected from humans and animals. The overall prevalence of Trichuris was 59.9{\%} as determined by microscopy examination. The molecular analysis showed that 98.7{\%} were identified as T. trichiura in the human fecal sample. Interestingly, 1.3{\%} were identified as T. vulpis. As for animal fecal sample, 56.8{\%} and 43.2{\%} were identified as T. trichiura and T. vulpis, respectively. Phylogenetic and sequence analysis demonstrated that T. trichiura isolates were genetically distinct from T. vulpis isolates from both hosts. This finding implies that companion animals can be a reservoir and mechanical transmitter for T. trichiura infection in human and also highlighting the possible zoonotic potential of T. vulpis. This finding may also suggest that cross-transmission between humans and animal hosts in sympatric setting may be a source of infection in both hosts. More studies are needed to better understand the transmission dynamic and public health significance of Trichuris infection in both hosts.",
keywords = "Human, Pet ownership, SSU ribosomal RNA, Trichuris trichiura, Trichuris vulpis",
author = "Norashikin Mohd-Shaharuddin and Lim, {Yvonne Ai Lian} and Hassan, {Nur Amirah} and Sheila Nathan and Romano Ngui",
year = "2019",
month = "2",
day = "1",
doi = "10.1016/j.actatropica.2018.11.026",
language = "English",
volume = "190",
pages = "269--272",
journal = "Acta Tropica",
issn = "0001-706X",
publisher = "Elsevier",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Molecular characterization of Trichuris species isolated from humans, dogs and cats in rural community Peninsular Malaysia

AU - Mohd-Shaharuddin, Norashikin

AU - Lim, Yvonne Ai Lian

AU - Hassan, Nur Amirah

AU - Nathan, Sheila

AU - Ngui, Romano

PY - 2019/2/1

Y1 - 2019/2/1

N2 - Trichuris trichiura (whipworm) are soil-transmitted helminths (STHs) that causing trichuriasis in human. Trichuris vulpis, a canine whipworm has also been reported occasionally in humans. However, an overlapping dimension in the morphology and due to limited external characters between both species may lead to the potential for misidentification. Although there has been an extensive study on the distribution of whipworm in both human and animal hosts, little is known about the molecular epidemiology of Trichuris species in both hosts. To investigate to characterize the whipworm species and to determine the genetic relationship between species infecting both humans and animals, we sequenced the small subunit ribosomal RNA (SSU rRNA) regions of Trichuris egg isolated from humans, dogs and cats in a rural community in Malaysia. A total of 524 fresh fecal samples were collected from humans and animals. The overall prevalence of Trichuris was 59.9% as determined by microscopy examination. The molecular analysis showed that 98.7% were identified as T. trichiura in the human fecal sample. Interestingly, 1.3% were identified as T. vulpis. As for animal fecal sample, 56.8% and 43.2% were identified as T. trichiura and T. vulpis, respectively. Phylogenetic and sequence analysis demonstrated that T. trichiura isolates were genetically distinct from T. vulpis isolates from both hosts. This finding implies that companion animals can be a reservoir and mechanical transmitter for T. trichiura infection in human and also highlighting the possible zoonotic potential of T. vulpis. This finding may also suggest that cross-transmission between humans and animal hosts in sympatric setting may be a source of infection in both hosts. More studies are needed to better understand the transmission dynamic and public health significance of Trichuris infection in both hosts.

AB - Trichuris trichiura (whipworm) are soil-transmitted helminths (STHs) that causing trichuriasis in human. Trichuris vulpis, a canine whipworm has also been reported occasionally in humans. However, an overlapping dimension in the morphology and due to limited external characters between both species may lead to the potential for misidentification. Although there has been an extensive study on the distribution of whipworm in both human and animal hosts, little is known about the molecular epidemiology of Trichuris species in both hosts. To investigate to characterize the whipworm species and to determine the genetic relationship between species infecting both humans and animals, we sequenced the small subunit ribosomal RNA (SSU rRNA) regions of Trichuris egg isolated from humans, dogs and cats in a rural community in Malaysia. A total of 524 fresh fecal samples were collected from humans and animals. The overall prevalence of Trichuris was 59.9% as determined by microscopy examination. The molecular analysis showed that 98.7% were identified as T. trichiura in the human fecal sample. Interestingly, 1.3% were identified as T. vulpis. As for animal fecal sample, 56.8% and 43.2% were identified as T. trichiura and T. vulpis, respectively. Phylogenetic and sequence analysis demonstrated that T. trichiura isolates were genetically distinct from T. vulpis isolates from both hosts. This finding implies that companion animals can be a reservoir and mechanical transmitter for T. trichiura infection in human and also highlighting the possible zoonotic potential of T. vulpis. This finding may also suggest that cross-transmission between humans and animal hosts in sympatric setting may be a source of infection in both hosts. More studies are needed to better understand the transmission dynamic and public health significance of Trichuris infection in both hosts.

KW - Human

KW - Pet ownership

KW - SSU ribosomal RNA

KW - Trichuris trichiura

KW - Trichuris vulpis

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=85057886174&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=85057886174&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1016/j.actatropica.2018.11.026

DO - 10.1016/j.actatropica.2018.11.026

M3 - Article

C2 - 30500371

AN - SCOPUS:85057886174

VL - 190

SP - 269

EP - 272

JO - Acta Tropica

JF - Acta Tropica

SN - 0001-706X

ER -