Mismanagement of cat bite wound

lessons to learn.

Leelavathi Muthupalani, M. A. Siti Aishah, Y. P. Wong, Adawiyah Jamil

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Animal inflicted wounds, left untreated may result in chronic bacterial or fungal infection. Clinical features of these infections may overlap leading to a delay in diagnosis and treatment. We report a case of chronic non-healing cat bite wound treated with several antibiotics without improvement. Later patient developed the classical "sporotrichoid spread" and a presumptive diagnosis of sporotrichosis was made. Laboratory investigation for fungal culture and skin biopsy failed to identify the underlying pathogen. A trial of oral antifungal agent resulted in complete recovery of the lesions implicating fungus as the causative pathogen. Physicians should have a high index of suspicion for fungal infections when managing animal inflicted wounds.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)225-227
Number of pages3
JournalLa Clinica terapeutica
Volume164
Issue number3
Publication statusPublished - May 2013

Fingerprint

Bites and Stings
Cats
Mycoses
Wounds and Injuries
Sporotrichosis
Antifungal Agents
Bacterial Infections
Fungi
Anti-Bacterial Agents
Physicians
Biopsy
Skin
Infection
Therapeutics

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Medicine(all)

Cite this

Mismanagement of cat bite wound : lessons to learn. / Muthupalani, Leelavathi; Siti Aishah, M. A.; Wong, Y. P.; Jamil, Adawiyah.

In: La Clinica terapeutica, Vol. 164, No. 3, 05.2013, p. 225-227.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Muthupalani, L, Siti Aishah, MA, Wong, YP & Jamil, A 2013, 'Mismanagement of cat bite wound: lessons to learn.', La Clinica terapeutica, vol. 164, no. 3, pp. 225-227.
Muthupalani, Leelavathi ; Siti Aishah, M. A. ; Wong, Y. P. ; Jamil, Adawiyah. / Mismanagement of cat bite wound : lessons to learn. In: La Clinica terapeutica. 2013 ; Vol. 164, No. 3. pp. 225-227.
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