Misconception of arabic language listening skills among teachers

Nik Mohd Rahimi Nik Yusoff, Mohd Sham Kamis, Wan Normeza

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

1 Citation (Scopus)

Abstract

Now-a-days, the teaching approach in the perspective of Arabic language listening skills as a second language is in the territory of unconcern. According to literature, there are twelve misconceptions that lead to the matter of lack of concern in Arabic language listening skills. The followings are the main factors that need to be obtained by the student, such as speaking, reading and writing without training and other language skills, as well as misconception which is involving the activity of teaching listening skills passively. Thus, the aim of this study is to identify teachers' misconception about the Arabic language listening skills. The research design of the study is a cross sectional by using a questionnaire to collect the research data. The respondents of the study were 100 Arabic language teachers who were selected randomly. The results demonstrated that the major misconceptions of listening skills among teachers is based on these findings: Arabic language listening skills can be indirectly acquired by the students while practicing Arabic language; teachers do not need to train listening skills, specifically in the classroom; Arabic language listening skills can be acquired automatically by integration with the reading skills practices; obtaining Arabic reading comprehension skills is more important than learn listening skills; obtaining comprehension skills of Arabic language is more necessary than learning listening skills; listening skills is not necessary in learning Arabic language; the activity which is connected to listening skills in the class cause emotional burden; eveiy activity of Arabic listening in the class sometimes can cause bored and frustrated. Thus, the lack of concern in teaching Arabic language listening skills is referring to the matter of misconception among Arabic teachers.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)347-350
Number of pages4
JournalSocial Sciences (Pakistan)
Volume8
Issue number4
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2013

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Keywords

  • Arabic language
  • Arabic language teacher
  • Learning Arabic
  • Listening skills
  • Misconception

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Social Sciences(all)

Cite this

Misconception of arabic language listening skills among teachers. / Nik Yusoff, Nik Mohd Rahimi; Kamis, Mohd Sham; Normeza, Wan.

In: Social Sciences (Pakistan), Vol. 8, No. 4, 2013, p. 347-350.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Nik Yusoff, Nik Mohd Rahimi ; Kamis, Mohd Sham ; Normeza, Wan. / Misconception of arabic language listening skills among teachers. In: Social Sciences (Pakistan). 2013 ; Vol. 8, No. 4. pp. 347-350.
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