Microneedle arrays as medical devices for enhanced transdermal drug delivery

Martin J. Garland, Katarzyna Migalska, Tuan Mazlelaa Tuan Mahmood, Thakur Raghu Raj Singh, A. David Woolfson, Ryan F. Donnelly

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

44 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

In order to exploit the transdermal route for systemic delivery of a wide range of drug molecules, including peptide/protein molecules and genetic material, a means of disrupting the excellent barrier properties of the uppermost layer of the skin, the stratum corneum, must be sought. The use of microneedle (MN) arrays has been proposed as a method to temporarily disrupt the barrier function of the skin and thus enable enhanced transdermal drug delivery. MN arrays consist of a plurality of micron-sized needles, generally ranging from 25 to 2000 μm in height, of a variety of different shapes and composition (e.g., silicon, metal, sugars and biodegradable polymers). The application of such MN arrays to the skin results in the creation of aqueous channels that are orders of magnitude larger than molecular dimensions and, therefore, should readily permit the transport of macromolecules. This article will focus on recent and future developments for MN technology, focusing on the materials used for MN fabrication, the forces required for MN insertion and potential safety aspects that may be involved with the use of MN devices.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)459-482
Number of pages24
JournalExpert Review of Medical Devices
Volume8
Issue number4
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Jul 2011
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Drug delivery
Skin
Equipment and Supplies
Pharmaceutical Preparations
Biodegradable polymers
Molecules
Silicon
Macromolecules
Sugars
Needles
Cornea
Peptides
Polymers
Metals
Technology
Proteins
Safety
Fabrication
Chemical analysis
Genes

Keywords

  • drug monitoring
  • microneedle arrays
  • public perception
  • safety
  • transdermal drug delivery
  • vaccination

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Surgery
  • Biomedical Engineering

Cite this

Garland, M. J., Migalska, K., Tuan Mahmood, T. M., Singh, T. R. R., Woolfson, A. D., & Donnelly, R. F. (2011). Microneedle arrays as medical devices for enhanced transdermal drug delivery. Expert Review of Medical Devices, 8(4), 459-482. https://doi.org/10.1586/erd.11.20

Microneedle arrays as medical devices for enhanced transdermal drug delivery. / Garland, Martin J.; Migalska, Katarzyna; Tuan Mahmood, Tuan Mazlelaa; Singh, Thakur Raghu Raj; Woolfson, A. David; Donnelly, Ryan F.

In: Expert Review of Medical Devices, Vol. 8, No. 4, 07.2011, p. 459-482.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Garland, MJ, Migalska, K, Tuan Mahmood, TM, Singh, TRR, Woolfson, AD & Donnelly, RF 2011, 'Microneedle arrays as medical devices for enhanced transdermal drug delivery', Expert Review of Medical Devices, vol. 8, no. 4, pp. 459-482. https://doi.org/10.1586/erd.11.20
Garland, Martin J. ; Migalska, Katarzyna ; Tuan Mahmood, Tuan Mazlelaa ; Singh, Thakur Raghu Raj ; Woolfson, A. David ; Donnelly, Ryan F. / Microneedle arrays as medical devices for enhanced transdermal drug delivery. In: Expert Review of Medical Devices. 2011 ; Vol. 8, No. 4. pp. 459-482.
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