Metastatic gestational trophoblastic Neoplasia

Masqueraded as respiratory disease and intracranial haemorrhage?

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Introduction: Metastatic gestational trophoblastic neoplasia (GTN) may present with symptoms unrelated to primary disease and be easily overlooked. Case: We report the case of a young lady who died of GTN with pulmonary embolism, lung and brain metastases. She presented with recurrent breathlessness. Serial chest radiographs showed worsening lung nodules and consolidations. The diagnosis was suspected following development of left frontoparietal haemorrhage and pulmonary embolism. Beta-hCG was raised. A history of abortion with partial hydatidiform mole 18 months ago was then obtained. Conclusion: Metastatic GTN should be considered in all reproductive-Aged women who present with bizarre respiratory and central nervous system symptoms, or imaging findings of metastasis of unknown primary.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)486-488
Number of pages3
JournalInternational Medical Journal
Volume22
Issue number6
Publication statusPublished - 1 Jan 2015

Fingerprint

Gestational Trophoblastic Disease
Intracranial Hemorrhages
Pulmonary Embolism
Neoplasm Metastasis
Hydatidiform Mole
Lung
Induced Abortion
Dyspnea
Thorax
Central Nervous System
Hemorrhage
Brain

Keywords

  • Gestational trophoblastic neoplasia (GTN)
  • Haemorrhagic brain metastasis
  • Hydatidiform mole
  • Lung nodules
  • Pulmonary embolism

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Medicine(all)

Cite this

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title = "Metastatic gestational trophoblastic Neoplasia: Masqueraded as respiratory disease and intracranial haemorrhage?",
abstract = "Introduction: Metastatic gestational trophoblastic neoplasia (GTN) may present with symptoms unrelated to primary disease and be easily overlooked. Case: We report the case of a young lady who died of GTN with pulmonary embolism, lung and brain metastases. She presented with recurrent breathlessness. Serial chest radiographs showed worsening lung nodules and consolidations. The diagnosis was suspected following development of left frontoparietal haemorrhage and pulmonary embolism. Beta-hCG was raised. A history of abortion with partial hydatidiform mole 18 months ago was then obtained. Conclusion: Metastatic GTN should be considered in all reproductive-Aged women who present with bizarre respiratory and central nervous system symptoms, or imaging findings of metastasis of unknown primary.",
keywords = "Gestational trophoblastic neoplasia (GTN), Haemorrhagic brain metastasis, Hydatidiform mole, Lung nodules, Pulmonary embolism",
author = "{Erica Yee Hing}, Wong and Low, {Soo Fin} and {Chai Soon}, Ngiu and {Kah Teik}, Chew and Zahiah Mohamed",
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AU - Erica Yee Hing, Wong

AU - Low, Soo Fin

AU - Chai Soon, Ngiu

AU - Kah Teik, Chew

AU - Mohamed, Zahiah

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AB - Introduction: Metastatic gestational trophoblastic neoplasia (GTN) may present with symptoms unrelated to primary disease and be easily overlooked. Case: We report the case of a young lady who died of GTN with pulmonary embolism, lung and brain metastases. She presented with recurrent breathlessness. Serial chest radiographs showed worsening lung nodules and consolidations. The diagnosis was suspected following development of left frontoparietal haemorrhage and pulmonary embolism. Beta-hCG was raised. A history of abortion with partial hydatidiform mole 18 months ago was then obtained. Conclusion: Metastatic GTN should be considered in all reproductive-Aged women who present with bizarre respiratory and central nervous system symptoms, or imaging findings of metastasis of unknown primary.

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KW - Hydatidiform mole

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