Metabolic syndrome based on IDF criteria in a sample of normal weight and obese school children

Y. V. Quah, Bee Koon Poh, M. N. Ismail

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

12 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Metabolic syndrome was once reported only in adults but is now occurring more frequently in children. This study compared the incidence of metabolic syndrome and its components among normal and obese children using the 2007 International Diabetes Federation (IDF) pediatric definition for metabolic syndrome. Subjects comprised 78 school children aged 8-10 years, with 34 obese and 44 normal weight children. Body weight, height, and waist circumference (WC) were measured and body mass index was calculated. Clinical profiles measured included fasting blood glucose, triglyceride, HDL cholesterol, LDL cholesterol, total cholesterol, and blood pressure. Metabolic syndrome (MS) was defined using the 2007 IDF pediatric criteria. Obese subjects had a significantly (p<0.001) higher mean BMI (26.0 ± 3.6 kg/m2) compared to normal weight subjects (15.1 ± 0.8 kg/m2). Only one obese subject (1.3% of subjects) had metabolic syndrome based on the IDF definition, but all obese subjects had at least one component of metabolic syndrome. In comparison, no normal weight subjects had metabolic syndrome and only 9.1% of normal weight subjects had at least one component of metabolic syndrome. The most common component was central obesity, observed in 43.6% of subjects having WC equal to or greater than the 90th percentile. In concurrence with central obesity as the core feature of the IDF criteria, WC showed the strongest correlation with indicators of obesity such as BMI (r=0.938, p<0.001), fat mass (r=0.912, p<0.001) and fat-free mass (r=0.863, p<0.001). We conclude that the problem of metabolic syndrome is more prominent among obese children, although the incidence of MS as defined by the 2007 pediatric IDF criteria, is low in this population (1.3%).

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)207-217
Number of pages11
JournalMalaysian Journal of Nutrition
Volume16
Issue number2
Publication statusPublished - 2010

Fingerprint

school children
metabolic syndrome
diabetes
Weights and Measures
waist circumference
Waist Circumference
sampling
obesity
Abdominal Obesity
Pediatrics
Fats
incidence
Body Height
lipids
low density lipoprotein cholesterol
high density lipoprotein cholesterol
LDL Cholesterol
HDL Cholesterol
blood glucose
blood pressure

Keywords

  • IDF criteria
  • Metabolic syndrome
  • Normal weight children
  • Obese children

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Nutrition and Dietetics
  • Food Science

Cite this

Metabolic syndrome based on IDF criteria in a sample of normal weight and obese school children. / Quah, Y. V.; Poh, Bee Koon; Ismail, M. N.

In: Malaysian Journal of Nutrition, Vol. 16, No. 2, 2010, p. 207-217.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

@article{6ad320e936124decb4767040efd7dd6a,
title = "Metabolic syndrome based on IDF criteria in a sample of normal weight and obese school children",
abstract = "Metabolic syndrome was once reported only in adults but is now occurring more frequently in children. This study compared the incidence of metabolic syndrome and its components among normal and obese children using the 2007 International Diabetes Federation (IDF) pediatric definition for metabolic syndrome. Subjects comprised 78 school children aged 8-10 years, with 34 obese and 44 normal weight children. Body weight, height, and waist circumference (WC) were measured and body mass index was calculated. Clinical profiles measured included fasting blood glucose, triglyceride, HDL cholesterol, LDL cholesterol, total cholesterol, and blood pressure. Metabolic syndrome (MS) was defined using the 2007 IDF pediatric criteria. Obese subjects had a significantly (p<0.001) higher mean BMI (26.0 ± 3.6 kg/m2) compared to normal weight subjects (15.1 ± 0.8 kg/m2). Only one obese subject (1.3{\%} of subjects) had metabolic syndrome based on the IDF definition, but all obese subjects had at least one component of metabolic syndrome. In comparison, no normal weight subjects had metabolic syndrome and only 9.1{\%} of normal weight subjects had at least one component of metabolic syndrome. The most common component was central obesity, observed in 43.6{\%} of subjects having WC equal to or greater than the 90th percentile. In concurrence with central obesity as the core feature of the IDF criteria, WC showed the strongest correlation with indicators of obesity such as BMI (r=0.938, p<0.001), fat mass (r=0.912, p<0.001) and fat-free mass (r=0.863, p<0.001). We conclude that the problem of metabolic syndrome is more prominent among obese children, although the incidence of MS as defined by the 2007 pediatric IDF criteria, is low in this population (1.3{\%}).",
keywords = "IDF criteria, Metabolic syndrome, Normal weight children, Obese children",
author = "Quah, {Y. V.} and Poh, {Bee Koon} and Ismail, {M. N.}",
year = "2010",
language = "English",
volume = "16",
pages = "207--217",
journal = "Malaysian Journal of Nutrition",
issn = "1394-035X",
publisher = "Persatuan Pemakanan Malaysia",
number = "2",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Metabolic syndrome based on IDF criteria in a sample of normal weight and obese school children

AU - Quah, Y. V.

AU - Poh, Bee Koon

AU - Ismail, M. N.

PY - 2010

Y1 - 2010

N2 - Metabolic syndrome was once reported only in adults but is now occurring more frequently in children. This study compared the incidence of metabolic syndrome and its components among normal and obese children using the 2007 International Diabetes Federation (IDF) pediatric definition for metabolic syndrome. Subjects comprised 78 school children aged 8-10 years, with 34 obese and 44 normal weight children. Body weight, height, and waist circumference (WC) were measured and body mass index was calculated. Clinical profiles measured included fasting blood glucose, triglyceride, HDL cholesterol, LDL cholesterol, total cholesterol, and blood pressure. Metabolic syndrome (MS) was defined using the 2007 IDF pediatric criteria. Obese subjects had a significantly (p<0.001) higher mean BMI (26.0 ± 3.6 kg/m2) compared to normal weight subjects (15.1 ± 0.8 kg/m2). Only one obese subject (1.3% of subjects) had metabolic syndrome based on the IDF definition, but all obese subjects had at least one component of metabolic syndrome. In comparison, no normal weight subjects had metabolic syndrome and only 9.1% of normal weight subjects had at least one component of metabolic syndrome. The most common component was central obesity, observed in 43.6% of subjects having WC equal to or greater than the 90th percentile. In concurrence with central obesity as the core feature of the IDF criteria, WC showed the strongest correlation with indicators of obesity such as BMI (r=0.938, p<0.001), fat mass (r=0.912, p<0.001) and fat-free mass (r=0.863, p<0.001). We conclude that the problem of metabolic syndrome is more prominent among obese children, although the incidence of MS as defined by the 2007 pediatric IDF criteria, is low in this population (1.3%).

AB - Metabolic syndrome was once reported only in adults but is now occurring more frequently in children. This study compared the incidence of metabolic syndrome and its components among normal and obese children using the 2007 International Diabetes Federation (IDF) pediatric definition for metabolic syndrome. Subjects comprised 78 school children aged 8-10 years, with 34 obese and 44 normal weight children. Body weight, height, and waist circumference (WC) were measured and body mass index was calculated. Clinical profiles measured included fasting blood glucose, triglyceride, HDL cholesterol, LDL cholesterol, total cholesterol, and blood pressure. Metabolic syndrome (MS) was defined using the 2007 IDF pediatric criteria. Obese subjects had a significantly (p<0.001) higher mean BMI (26.0 ± 3.6 kg/m2) compared to normal weight subjects (15.1 ± 0.8 kg/m2). Only one obese subject (1.3% of subjects) had metabolic syndrome based on the IDF definition, but all obese subjects had at least one component of metabolic syndrome. In comparison, no normal weight subjects had metabolic syndrome and only 9.1% of normal weight subjects had at least one component of metabolic syndrome. The most common component was central obesity, observed in 43.6% of subjects having WC equal to or greater than the 90th percentile. In concurrence with central obesity as the core feature of the IDF criteria, WC showed the strongest correlation with indicators of obesity such as BMI (r=0.938, p<0.001), fat mass (r=0.912, p<0.001) and fat-free mass (r=0.863, p<0.001). We conclude that the problem of metabolic syndrome is more prominent among obese children, although the incidence of MS as defined by the 2007 pediatric IDF criteria, is low in this population (1.3%).

KW - IDF criteria

KW - Metabolic syndrome

KW - Normal weight children

KW - Obese children

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=78049491689&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=78049491689&partnerID=8YFLogxK

M3 - Article

C2 - 22691926

AN - SCOPUS:78049491689

VL - 16

SP - 207

EP - 217

JO - Malaysian Journal of Nutrition

JF - Malaysian Journal of Nutrition

SN - 1394-035X

IS - 2

ER -