Meeting the best practice for hearing aid verification in children: Challenges and future directions

Nur Azyani Amri, Tian Kar Quar, Foong Yen Chong

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Purpose: This study examined the current pediatric amplification practice with anemphasisonhearingaid verification using probe microphone measurement (PMM), among audiologists in Klang Valley, Malaysia. Frequency of practice, access to PMM system, practiced protocols, barriers, and perception toward the benefits of PMM were identified through a survey. Method: A questionnaire was distributed to and filled in by the audiologists who provided pediatric amplification service in Klang Valley, Malaysia. One hundred eight (N =108) audiologists, composed of 90.3% women and 9.7% men (age range: 23–48 years), participated in the survey. Results: PMM was not a clinical routine practiced by a majority of the audiologists, despite its recognition as the best clinical practice that should be incorporated into protocols for fitting hearing aids in children. Variations in practice existed warranting further steps to improve the current practice for children with hearing impairment. The lack of access to PMM equipment was 1 major barrier for the audiologists to practice real-ear verification. Practitioners’ characteristics such as time constraints, low confidence, and knowledge levels were also identified as barriers that impede the uptake of the evidence-based practice. Conclusions: The implementation of PMM in clinical practice remains a challenge to the audiology profession. A knowledge-transfer approach that takes into consideration the barriers and involves effective collaboration or engagement between the knowledge providers and potential stakeholders is required to promote the clinical application of evidence-based best practice.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)877-894
Number of pages18
JournalAmerican Journal of Audiology
Volume28
Issue number4
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 1 Jan 2019

Fingerprint

Hearing Aids
Practice Guidelines
Evidence-Based Practice
Malaysia
Pediatrics
Audiology
Hearing Loss
Ear
Audiologists
Direction compound
Equipment and Supplies
Surveys and Questionnaires

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Speech and Hearing

Cite this

Meeting the best practice for hearing aid verification in children : Challenges and future directions. / Amri, Nur Azyani; Quar, Tian Kar; Chong, Foong Yen.

In: American Journal of Audiology, Vol. 28, No. 4, 01.01.2019, p. 877-894.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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