Mediator-less microbial fuel cell

Byung Hong Kim, In Seop Chang, Jae Kyung Jang, Jiyoung Lee

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

Abstract

Cyclic voltammetry showed that some anaerobic bacteria are electrochemically active. They oxidize electron donor in the anode compartment of a fuel cell-type device without an electron acceptor, transferring electron to the electrode. Electrochemically active bacterial consortia could be enriched in fuel cell-type electrochemical cell under various nutritional conditions. They were studied as a novel wastewater treatment process with energy recovery and as a novel BOD sensor. In most cases the effluent from microbial fuel cell (MFC) fed with wastewater contained BOD < 10 mg/L with the sludge production < 1/4 of the conventional activated sludge process. MFC as a novel wastewater treatment process is promising not only because of the energy recovery in the form of electricity but also because of energy saving to treat sludge generated. MFC can be used as a BOD sensor as well as stabilizing sediment to improve water quality in lakes. This is an abstract of a paper presented ACS Fuel Chemistry Meeting (Washington, DC Fall 2005).

Original languageEnglish
Title of host publicationACS Division of Fuel Chemistry, Preprints
Pages667-668
Number of pages2
Volume50
Edition2
Publication statusPublished - 2005
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Microbial fuel cells
Biochemical oxygen demand
Wastewater treatment
Electrons
Fuel cells
Activated sludge process
Recovery
Electrochemical cells
Sensors
Cyclic voltammetry
Water quality
Lakes
Effluents
Bacteria
Energy conservation
Anodes
Sediments
Wastewater
Electricity
Electrodes

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Energy(all)

Cite this

Kim, B. H., Chang, I. S., Jang, J. K., & Lee, J. (2005). Mediator-less microbial fuel cell. In ACS Division of Fuel Chemistry, Preprints (2 ed., Vol. 50, pp. 667-668)

Mediator-less microbial fuel cell. / Kim, Byung Hong; Chang, In Seop; Jang, Jae Kyung; Lee, Jiyoung.

ACS Division of Fuel Chemistry, Preprints. Vol. 50 2. ed. 2005. p. 667-668.

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

Kim, BH, Chang, IS, Jang, JK & Lee, J 2005, Mediator-less microbial fuel cell. in ACS Division of Fuel Chemistry, Preprints. 2 edn, vol. 50, pp. 667-668.
Kim BH, Chang IS, Jang JK, Lee J. Mediator-less microbial fuel cell. In ACS Division of Fuel Chemistry, Preprints. 2 ed. Vol. 50. 2005. p. 667-668
Kim, Byung Hong ; Chang, In Seop ; Jang, Jae Kyung ; Lee, Jiyoung. / Mediator-less microbial fuel cell. ACS Division of Fuel Chemistry, Preprints. Vol. 50 2. ed. 2005. pp. 667-668
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