Maxillofacial injuries and traumatic brain injury - a pilot study

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

16 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Background: Maxillofacial injuries comprising hard tissue as well as soft tissue injuries can be associated with traumatic brain injuries due to the impact of forces transmitted through the head and neck. To date, the role of maxillofacial injury on brain injury has not been properly documented with some saying it has a protective function on the brain while others opposing this idea. Aim: This cross-sectional retrospective study evaluated all patients with maxillofacial injuries. The aim of the study was to analyze the occurrence and relationship of maxillofacial injuries with traumatic brain injuries. Material and Methods: We retrospectively studied the hospital charts of all trauma patients seen at the accident and emergency department of UKM Medical Centre from November 2010 until November 2011. A detail analysis was then carried out on all patients who satisfied the inclusion and exclusion criteria. Results: A total of 11294 patients were classified as trauma patients in which 176 patients had facial fractures and 292 did not have facial fractures. Middle face fractures was the most common pattern of facial fracture seen. Traumatic brain injury was present in 36.7% of maxillofacial cases. A significant association was found between facial fractures and traumatic brain injury (P < 0.05). Patient with facial fractures had a 1.5 increased risk of having a traumatic brain injury (95% CI 1.197-1.909). Conclusion: Patients with maxillofacial injuries with or without facial fractures are at risk of acute or delayed traumatic brain injury. All patients should always have proper radiological investigations together with a proper observation and follow-up schedule.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)128-132
Number of pages5
JournalDental Traumatology
Volume30
Issue number2
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Apr 2014

Fingerprint

Maxillofacial Injuries
Traumatic Brain Injury
Soft Tissue Injuries
Wounds and Injuries
Brain Injuries
Hospital Emergency Service
Appointments and Schedules
Neck
Retrospective Studies
Cross-Sectional Studies
Head
Observation

Keywords

  • Facial bone fracture
  • Facial trauma
  • Maxillofacial trauma
  • Motor vehicle accident
  • Traumatic brain injury

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Oral Surgery

Cite this

Maxillofacial injuries and traumatic brain injury - a pilot study. / Rajandram, Rama Krsna; Syed Omar, Syed Nabil; Rashdi, Muhd Fazly Nizam; Abd Jabar, Mohd Nazimi.

In: Dental Traumatology, Vol. 30, No. 2, 04.2014, p. 128-132.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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