Mapping the interfacial binding surface of human secretory group IIa phospholipase A2

Yana Snitko, Rao S. Koduri, Sang K. Han, Roohaida Othman, Sharon F. Baker, Barbara J. Molini, David C. Wilton, Michael H. Gelb, Wonhwa Cho

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

102 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Human secretory group IIa phospholipase A2 (hIIa-PLA2) contains a large number of prominent cationic patches on its molecular surface and has exceptionally high affinity for anionic surfaces, including anionic membranes. To identify the cationic amino acid residues that support binding of hIIa-PLA2 to anionic membranes, we have performed extensive site-directed mutagenesis of this protein and measured vesicle binding and interfacial kinetic properties of the mutants using polymerized liposomes and nonpolymerized anionic vesicles. Unlike other secretory PLA2s, which have a few cationic residues that support binding of enzyme to anionic membranes, interfacial binding of hIIa-PLA2 is driven in part by electrostatic interactions involving a number of cationic residues forming patches on the putative interfacial binding surface. Among these residues, the amino- terminal patch composed of Arg-7, Lys-10, and Lys-16 makes the most significant contribution to interfacial adsorption, and this is supplemented by contributions from other patches, most notably Lys-74/Lys-87/Arg-92 and Lys-124/Arg-127. For these mutants, complete vesicle binding occurs in the presence of high vesicle concentrations, and under these conditions the mutants display specific activities comparable to that of wild-type enzyme. These studies indicate that electrostatic interactions between surface lysine and arginine residues and the interface contribute to interfacial binding of hIIa-PLA2 to anionic vesicles and that cationic residues closest to the opening of the active-site slot make the most important interactions with the membrane. However, because the wild type binds extremely tightly to anionic vesicles, it was not possible to exactly determine what fraction of the total interfacial binding energy is due to electrostatics.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)14325-14333
Number of pages9
JournalBiochemistry
Volume36
Issue number47
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 25 Nov 1997
Externally publishedYes

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Phospholipases A2
Static Electricity
Membranes
Coulomb interactions
Mutagenesis
Enzymes
Site-Directed Mutagenesis
Binding energy
Liposomes
Adsorption
Lysine
Arginine
Electrostatics
Catalytic Domain
Amino Acids
Kinetics
Proteins

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Biochemistry

Cite this

Snitko, Y., Koduri, R. S., Han, S. K., Othman, R., Baker, S. F., Molini, B. J., ... Cho, W. (1997). Mapping the interfacial binding surface of human secretory group IIa phospholipase A2. Biochemistry, 36(47), 14325-14333. https://doi.org/10.1021/bi971200z

Mapping the interfacial binding surface of human secretory group IIa phospholipase A2. / Snitko, Yana; Koduri, Rao S.; Han, Sang K.; Othman, Roohaida; Baker, Sharon F.; Molini, Barbara J.; Wilton, David C.; Gelb, Michael H.; Cho, Wonhwa.

In: Biochemistry, Vol. 36, No. 47, 25.11.1997, p. 14325-14333.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Snitko, Y, Koduri, RS, Han, SK, Othman, R, Baker, SF, Molini, BJ, Wilton, DC, Gelb, MH & Cho, W 1997, 'Mapping the interfacial binding surface of human secretory group IIa phospholipase A2', Biochemistry, vol. 36, no. 47, pp. 14325-14333. https://doi.org/10.1021/bi971200z
Snitko, Yana ; Koduri, Rao S. ; Han, Sang K. ; Othman, Roohaida ; Baker, Sharon F. ; Molini, Barbara J. ; Wilton, David C. ; Gelb, Michael H. ; Cho, Wonhwa. / Mapping the interfacial binding surface of human secretory group IIa phospholipase A2. In: Biochemistry. 1997 ; Vol. 36, No. 47. pp. 14325-14333.
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