Managing the risks: International level and integration across scales

Ian Burton, O. Pauline Dube, Diarmid Campbell-Lendrum, Ian Davis, Richard J T Klein, Joanne Linnerooth-Bayer, Apurva Sanghi, Ferenc Toth, Joy Jacqueline Pereira, Linda Sygna, Neil Adger, Thea Dickinson, Kris Ebi, Md Tarik Ul Islam, Clarisse Kehler Siebert

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingChapter

7 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Increasing global interconnectivity, population, and economic growth, and the mutual interdependence of economic and ecological systems, can serve both to reduce vulnerability and to amplify disaster risks (high confidence). Global development pathways are becoming a more important factor in the management of vulnerability and disaster risk. [7.2.1] The international community has accumulated substantial experience in providing help for disasters and risk management in the context of localized and short-term events associated with climate variability and extremes. Experience in disaster risk management includes both bottom-up and top-down approaches, but most often has developed from disasters considered first as local issues, then at the national level, and only at the international level where needs exceed national capacity, especially in terms of humanitarian assistance and capacity building. [7.2.4] There are two main mechanisms at the international level that are purpose-built and dedicated to disaster risk management and climate change adaptation. These are the United Nations International Strategy for Disaster Reduction (UNISDR) and the United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change (UNFCCC), in particular in its adaptation components. This chapter focuses on these two bodies while recognizing that there are many others that have an international role to play. Page limitations require a selective approach and a comprehensive assessment of all relevant bodies is impractical. The UNISDR and the UNFCCC are very different institutions with different mandates and scope and objectives, and with varying strengths and capacities (high confidence).

Original languageEnglish
Title of host publicationManaging the Risks of Extreme Events and Disasters to Advance Climate Change Adaptation: Special Report of the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change
PublisherCambridge University Press
Pages393-436
Number of pages44
ISBN (Print)9781139177245, 9781107025066
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 1 Jan 2012

Fingerprint

disaster
United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change
United Nations
vulnerability
top-down approach
disaster management
capacity building
economic growth
population growth
climate
economics
risk management

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Earth and Planetary Sciences(all)

Cite this

Burton, I., Dube, O. P., Campbell-Lendrum, D., Davis, I., Klein, R. J. T., Linnerooth-Bayer, J., ... Siebert, C. K. (2012). Managing the risks: International level and integration across scales. In Managing the Risks of Extreme Events and Disasters to Advance Climate Change Adaptation: Special Report of the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (pp. 393-436). Cambridge University Press. https://doi.org/10.1017/CBO9781139177245.010

Managing the risks : International level and integration across scales. / Burton, Ian; Dube, O. Pauline; Campbell-Lendrum, Diarmid; Davis, Ian; Klein, Richard J T; Linnerooth-Bayer, Joanne; Sanghi, Apurva; Toth, Ferenc; Pereira, Joy Jacqueline; Sygna, Linda; Adger, Neil; Dickinson, Thea; Ebi, Kris; Islam, Md Tarik Ul; Siebert, Clarisse Kehler.

Managing the Risks of Extreme Events and Disasters to Advance Climate Change Adaptation: Special Report of the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change. Cambridge University Press, 2012. p. 393-436.

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingChapter

Burton, I, Dube, OP, Campbell-Lendrum, D, Davis, I, Klein, RJT, Linnerooth-Bayer, J, Sanghi, A, Toth, F, Pereira, JJ, Sygna, L, Adger, N, Dickinson, T, Ebi, K, Islam, MTU & Siebert, CK 2012, Managing the risks: International level and integration across scales. in Managing the Risks of Extreme Events and Disasters to Advance Climate Change Adaptation: Special Report of the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change. Cambridge University Press, pp. 393-436. https://doi.org/10.1017/CBO9781139177245.010
Burton I, Dube OP, Campbell-Lendrum D, Davis I, Klein RJT, Linnerooth-Bayer J et al. Managing the risks: International level and integration across scales. In Managing the Risks of Extreme Events and Disasters to Advance Climate Change Adaptation: Special Report of the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change. Cambridge University Press. 2012. p. 393-436 https://doi.org/10.1017/CBO9781139177245.010
Burton, Ian ; Dube, O. Pauline ; Campbell-Lendrum, Diarmid ; Davis, Ian ; Klein, Richard J T ; Linnerooth-Bayer, Joanne ; Sanghi, Apurva ; Toth, Ferenc ; Pereira, Joy Jacqueline ; Sygna, Linda ; Adger, Neil ; Dickinson, Thea ; Ebi, Kris ; Islam, Md Tarik Ul ; Siebert, Clarisse Kehler. / Managing the risks : International level and integration across scales. Managing the Risks of Extreme Events and Disasters to Advance Climate Change Adaptation: Special Report of the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change. Cambridge University Press, 2012. pp. 393-436
@inbook{4ba9e554c63247d98754e96fe7162657,
title = "Managing the risks: International level and integration across scales",
abstract = "Increasing global interconnectivity, population, and economic growth, and the mutual interdependence of economic and ecological systems, can serve both to reduce vulnerability and to amplify disaster risks (high confidence). Global development pathways are becoming a more important factor in the management of vulnerability and disaster risk. [7.2.1] The international community has accumulated substantial experience in providing help for disasters and risk management in the context of localized and short-term events associated with climate variability and extremes. Experience in disaster risk management includes both bottom-up and top-down approaches, but most often has developed from disasters considered first as local issues, then at the national level, and only at the international level where needs exceed national capacity, especially in terms of humanitarian assistance and capacity building. [7.2.4] There are two main mechanisms at the international level that are purpose-built and dedicated to disaster risk management and climate change adaptation. These are the United Nations International Strategy for Disaster Reduction (UNISDR) and the United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change (UNFCCC), in particular in its adaptation components. This chapter focuses on these two bodies while recognizing that there are many others that have an international role to play. Page limitations require a selective approach and a comprehensive assessment of all relevant bodies is impractical. The UNISDR and the UNFCCC are very different institutions with different mandates and scope and objectives, and with varying strengths and capacities (high confidence).",
author = "Ian Burton and Dube, {O. Pauline} and Diarmid Campbell-Lendrum and Ian Davis and Klein, {Richard J T} and Joanne Linnerooth-Bayer and Apurva Sanghi and Ferenc Toth and Pereira, {Joy Jacqueline} and Linda Sygna and Neil Adger and Thea Dickinson and Kris Ebi and Islam, {Md Tarik Ul} and Siebert, {Clarisse Kehler}",
year = "2012",
month = "1",
day = "1",
doi = "10.1017/CBO9781139177245.010",
language = "English",
isbn = "9781139177245",
pages = "393--436",
booktitle = "Managing the Risks of Extreme Events and Disasters to Advance Climate Change Adaptation: Special Report of the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change",
publisher = "Cambridge University Press",

}

TY - CHAP

T1 - Managing the risks

T2 - International level and integration across scales

AU - Burton, Ian

AU - Dube, O. Pauline

AU - Campbell-Lendrum, Diarmid

AU - Davis, Ian

AU - Klein, Richard J T

AU - Linnerooth-Bayer, Joanne

AU - Sanghi, Apurva

AU - Toth, Ferenc

AU - Pereira, Joy Jacqueline

AU - Sygna, Linda

AU - Adger, Neil

AU - Dickinson, Thea

AU - Ebi, Kris

AU - Islam, Md Tarik Ul

AU - Siebert, Clarisse Kehler

PY - 2012/1/1

Y1 - 2012/1/1

N2 - Increasing global interconnectivity, population, and economic growth, and the mutual interdependence of economic and ecological systems, can serve both to reduce vulnerability and to amplify disaster risks (high confidence). Global development pathways are becoming a more important factor in the management of vulnerability and disaster risk. [7.2.1] The international community has accumulated substantial experience in providing help for disasters and risk management in the context of localized and short-term events associated with climate variability and extremes. Experience in disaster risk management includes both bottom-up and top-down approaches, but most often has developed from disasters considered first as local issues, then at the national level, and only at the international level where needs exceed national capacity, especially in terms of humanitarian assistance and capacity building. [7.2.4] There are two main mechanisms at the international level that are purpose-built and dedicated to disaster risk management and climate change adaptation. These are the United Nations International Strategy for Disaster Reduction (UNISDR) and the United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change (UNFCCC), in particular in its adaptation components. This chapter focuses on these two bodies while recognizing that there are many others that have an international role to play. Page limitations require a selective approach and a comprehensive assessment of all relevant bodies is impractical. The UNISDR and the UNFCCC are very different institutions with different mandates and scope and objectives, and with varying strengths and capacities (high confidence).

AB - Increasing global interconnectivity, population, and economic growth, and the mutual interdependence of economic and ecological systems, can serve both to reduce vulnerability and to amplify disaster risks (high confidence). Global development pathways are becoming a more important factor in the management of vulnerability and disaster risk. [7.2.1] The international community has accumulated substantial experience in providing help for disasters and risk management in the context of localized and short-term events associated with climate variability and extremes. Experience in disaster risk management includes both bottom-up and top-down approaches, but most often has developed from disasters considered first as local issues, then at the national level, and only at the international level where needs exceed national capacity, especially in terms of humanitarian assistance and capacity building. [7.2.4] There are two main mechanisms at the international level that are purpose-built and dedicated to disaster risk management and climate change adaptation. These are the United Nations International Strategy for Disaster Reduction (UNISDR) and the United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change (UNFCCC), in particular in its adaptation components. This chapter focuses on these two bodies while recognizing that there are many others that have an international role to play. Page limitations require a selective approach and a comprehensive assessment of all relevant bodies is impractical. The UNISDR and the UNFCCC are very different institutions with different mandates and scope and objectives, and with varying strengths and capacities (high confidence).

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=84888026734&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=84888026734&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1017/CBO9781139177245.010

DO - 10.1017/CBO9781139177245.010

M3 - Chapter

AN - SCOPUS:84888026734

SN - 9781139177245

SN - 9781107025066

SP - 393

EP - 436

BT - Managing the Risks of Extreme Events and Disasters to Advance Climate Change Adaptation: Special Report of the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change

PB - Cambridge University Press

ER -