Managing burn wounds with SMARTPORE Technology polyurethane foam: Two case reports

Farrah Hani Imran, Rahamah Karim, Noor Hidayah Maat

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

3 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Background: Successful wound healing depends on various factors, including exudate control, prevention of microbial contaminants, and moisture balance. We report two cases of managing burn wounds with SMARTPORE Technology polyurethane foam dressing. Case presentation: In Case 1, a 2-year-old Asian girl presented with a delayed (11 days) wound on her right leg. She sustained a thermal injury from a hot iron that was left idle on the floor. Clinical inspection revealed an infected wound with overlying eschar that traversed her knee joint. As her parents refused surgical debridement under general anesthesia, hydrotherapy and wound dressing using SMARTPORE Technology Polyurethane foam were used. Despite the delay in presentation of this linear thermal pediatric burn injury that crossed the knee joint, the patient's response to treatment and its outcome were highly encouraging. She was cooperative and tolerated each dressing change without the need of supplemental analgesia. Her wound was healed by 24 days postadmission. In Case 2, a 25-year-old Asian man presented with a mixed thickness thermal flame burn on his left leg. On examination, the injury was a mix of deep and superficial partial thickness burn, comprising approximately 3 % of his total body surface area. SMARTPORE Technology polyurethane foam was used on his wound; his response to the treatment was very encouraging as the dressing facilitated physiotherapy and mobility. The patient rated the pain during dressing change as 2 on a scale of 10 and his pain score remained the same in every subsequent change. His wound showed evidence of epithelialization by day 7 post-burn. There were no adverse events reported. Conclusions: Managing burn wounds with SMARTPORE Technology polyurethane foam resulted in reduced pain during dressing changes and the successful healing of partial and mixed thickness wounds. The use of SMARTPORE Technology polyurethane foam dressings showed encouraging results and requires further research as a desirable management option in burn wounds.

Original languageEnglish
Article number120
JournalJournal of Medical Case Reports
Volume10
Issue number1
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2016

Fingerprint

Technology
Bandages
Wounds and Injuries
Hot Temperature
Knee Joint
Pain
polyurethane foam
Leg
Hydrotherapy
Body Surface Area
Exudates and Transudates
Debridement
Burns
Wound Healing
Analgesia
General Anesthesia
Iron
Parents
Pediatrics
Research

Keywords

  • Atraumatic dressing removal
  • Burn wounds
  • Case report
  • Exudate
  • Exudating wound
  • SMARTPORE Technology polyurethane foam
  • Wound dressing

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Medicine(all)

Cite this

Managing burn wounds with SMARTPORE Technology polyurethane foam : Two case reports. / Imran, Farrah Hani; Karim, Rahamah; Maat, Noor Hidayah.

In: Journal of Medical Case Reports, Vol. 10, No. 1, 120, 2016.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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abstract = "Background: Successful wound healing depends on various factors, including exudate control, prevention of microbial contaminants, and moisture balance. We report two cases of managing burn wounds with SMARTPORE Technology polyurethane foam dressing. Case presentation: In Case 1, a 2-year-old Asian girl presented with a delayed (11 days) wound on her right leg. She sustained a thermal injury from a hot iron that was left idle on the floor. Clinical inspection revealed an infected wound with overlying eschar that traversed her knee joint. As her parents refused surgical debridement under general anesthesia, hydrotherapy and wound dressing using SMARTPORE Technology Polyurethane foam were used. Despite the delay in presentation of this linear thermal pediatric burn injury that crossed the knee joint, the patient's response to treatment and its outcome were highly encouraging. She was cooperative and tolerated each dressing change without the need of supplemental analgesia. Her wound was healed by 24 days postadmission. In Case 2, a 25-year-old Asian man presented with a mixed thickness thermal flame burn on his left leg. On examination, the injury was a mix of deep and superficial partial thickness burn, comprising approximately 3 {\%} of his total body surface area. SMARTPORE Technology polyurethane foam was used on his wound; his response to the treatment was very encouraging as the dressing facilitated physiotherapy and mobility. The patient rated the pain during dressing change as 2 on a scale of 10 and his pain score remained the same in every subsequent change. His wound showed evidence of epithelialization by day 7 post-burn. There were no adverse events reported. Conclusions: Managing burn wounds with SMARTPORE Technology polyurethane foam resulted in reduced pain during dressing changes and the successful healing of partial and mixed thickness wounds. The use of SMARTPORE Technology polyurethane foam dressings showed encouraging results and requires further research as a desirable management option in burn wounds.",
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