Malaysia's US Policy Under Najib

Structural and Domestic Sources of a Small State's Strategy

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

3 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

This article explains Malaysia's US policy under Prime Minister Najib. It argues that to the extent that there is a "shift" in Malaysia's policy, its substance has been shaped by structural and domestic considerations. Structurally, in the face of a fast rising China, Malaysia is compelled to keep a more balanced relationship with all the major powers. This structural push, reinforced by Obama's "pivot," has been nonetheless limited by a concern about the risks of entrapment, abandonment, and antagonism. Domestically, there are economic and political motivations to develop closer ties with Washington. These, however, have been counteracted by a calculation of not wanting to align too closely with America. These structural and domestic determinants together explain the smaller state's strategy towards the superpower at a time of systemic change.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)143-164
Number of pages22
JournalAsian Security
Volume9
Issue number3
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Sep 2013

Fingerprint

small state
Malaysia
Economics
antagonism
minister
determinants
China
economics

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Political Science and International Relations
  • Safety Research

Cite this

Malaysia's US Policy Under Najib : Structural and Domestic Sources of a Small State's Strategy. / Cheng Chwee, Kuik.

In: Asian Security, Vol. 9, No. 3, 09.2013, p. 143-164.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

@article{e7d3c29b879e4c06a4a9374cecb2cc73,
title = "Malaysia's US Policy Under Najib: Structural and Domestic Sources of a Small State's Strategy",
abstract = "This article explains Malaysia's US policy under Prime Minister Najib. It argues that to the extent that there is a {"}shift{"} in Malaysia's policy, its substance has been shaped by structural and domestic considerations. Structurally, in the face of a fast rising China, Malaysia is compelled to keep a more balanced relationship with all the major powers. This structural push, reinforced by Obama's {"}pivot,{"} has been nonetheless limited by a concern about the risks of entrapment, abandonment, and antagonism. Domestically, there are economic and political motivations to develop closer ties with Washington. These, however, have been counteracted by a calculation of not wanting to align too closely with America. These structural and domestic determinants together explain the smaller state's strategy towards the superpower at a time of systemic change.",
author = "{Cheng Chwee}, Kuik",
year = "2013",
month = "9",
doi = "10.1080/14799855.2013.832211",
language = "English",
volume = "9",
pages = "143--164",
journal = "Asian Security",
issn = "1479-9855",
publisher = "Routledge",
number = "3",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Malaysia's US Policy Under Najib

T2 - Structural and Domestic Sources of a Small State's Strategy

AU - Cheng Chwee, Kuik

PY - 2013/9

Y1 - 2013/9

N2 - This article explains Malaysia's US policy under Prime Minister Najib. It argues that to the extent that there is a "shift" in Malaysia's policy, its substance has been shaped by structural and domestic considerations. Structurally, in the face of a fast rising China, Malaysia is compelled to keep a more balanced relationship with all the major powers. This structural push, reinforced by Obama's "pivot," has been nonetheless limited by a concern about the risks of entrapment, abandonment, and antagonism. Domestically, there are economic and political motivations to develop closer ties with Washington. These, however, have been counteracted by a calculation of not wanting to align too closely with America. These structural and domestic determinants together explain the smaller state's strategy towards the superpower at a time of systemic change.

AB - This article explains Malaysia's US policy under Prime Minister Najib. It argues that to the extent that there is a "shift" in Malaysia's policy, its substance has been shaped by structural and domestic considerations. Structurally, in the face of a fast rising China, Malaysia is compelled to keep a more balanced relationship with all the major powers. This structural push, reinforced by Obama's "pivot," has been nonetheless limited by a concern about the risks of entrapment, abandonment, and antagonism. Domestically, there are economic and political motivations to develop closer ties with Washington. These, however, have been counteracted by a calculation of not wanting to align too closely with America. These structural and domestic determinants together explain the smaller state's strategy towards the superpower at a time of systemic change.

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=84887199663&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=84887199663&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1080/14799855.2013.832211

DO - 10.1080/14799855.2013.832211

M3 - Article

VL - 9

SP - 143

EP - 164

JO - Asian Security

JF - Asian Security

SN - 1479-9855

IS - 3

ER -