Malaysian children with spina bifida

Relationship between functional outcome and level of lesion

Lai Choo Ong, Y. N. Lim, A. Sofiah

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

    9 Citations (Scopus)

    Abstract

    Purpose: To determine the relationship between spinal lesion level and functional outcome in children with spina bifida. Methods: Prospective observational study of 66 children who attended the Spina Bifida Clinic from 1994-1997. Data were obtained from serial physical examination and parent interview to determine mobility status, neurosensory deficits, continence and school placement. Results: Eighteen (27.3%) had high-level (thoracic and thoracolumbar), 27 (40.9%) intermediate (low lumbar) and 21 (31.8%) low-level (sacral) lesions. Children with high-level lesions experienced more mobility problems (independent ambulation, balance and use of appliances), than those with intermediate or low-level lesions (p<0.001). 58.8% of children with low-level lesions used diapers, compared with those with high (90%) or intermediate (100%) level lesions (p = 0.005), but there were no significant differences in the incidence of soiling or urinary incontinence among all three groups. There were no significant differences among the three groups in terms of school placement, skin breakdown, epilepsy or visual defect. Conclusion: Although there is good correlation between the level of the lesion and mobility in children with spina bifida, other measures of functional outcome like continence and school placement are more difficult to predict. These data are important for realistic counselling of families with newborns with spina and planning long term rehabilitation resources.

    Original languageEnglish
    Pages (from-to)12-17
    Number of pages6
    JournalSingapore Medical Journal
    Volume43
    Issue number1
    Publication statusPublished - Jan 2002

    Fingerprint

    Spinal Dysraphism
    Urinary Incontinence
    Physical Examination
    Walking
    Observational Studies
    Counseling
    Epilepsy
    Thorax
    Rehabilitation
    Outcome Assessment (Health Care)
    Newborn Infant
    Prospective Studies
    Interviews
    Skin
    Incidence

    Keywords

    • Children
    • Outcome
    • Spina bifida

    ASJC Scopus subject areas

    • Medicine(all)

    Cite this

    Malaysian children with spina bifida : Relationship between functional outcome and level of lesion. / Ong, Lai Choo; Lim, Y. N.; Sofiah, A.

    In: Singapore Medical Journal, Vol. 43, No. 1, 01.2002, p. 12-17.

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

    Ong, Lai Choo ; Lim, Y. N. ; Sofiah, A. / Malaysian children with spina bifida : Relationship between functional outcome and level of lesion. In: Singapore Medical Journal. 2002 ; Vol. 43, No. 1. pp. 12-17.
    @article{d8712540bf8847c4a23cb6da48a82827,
    title = "Malaysian children with spina bifida: Relationship between functional outcome and level of lesion",
    abstract = "Purpose: To determine the relationship between spinal lesion level and functional outcome in children with spina bifida. Methods: Prospective observational study of 66 children who attended the Spina Bifida Clinic from 1994-1997. Data were obtained from serial physical examination and parent interview to determine mobility status, neurosensory deficits, continence and school placement. Results: Eighteen (27.3{\%}) had high-level (thoracic and thoracolumbar), 27 (40.9{\%}) intermediate (low lumbar) and 21 (31.8{\%}) low-level (sacral) lesions. Children with high-level lesions experienced more mobility problems (independent ambulation, balance and use of appliances), than those with intermediate or low-level lesions (p<0.001). 58.8{\%} of children with low-level lesions used diapers, compared with those with high (90{\%}) or intermediate (100{\%}) level lesions (p = 0.005), but there were no significant differences in the incidence of soiling or urinary incontinence among all three groups. There were no significant differences among the three groups in terms of school placement, skin breakdown, epilepsy or visual defect. Conclusion: Although there is good correlation between the level of the lesion and mobility in children with spina bifida, other measures of functional outcome like continence and school placement are more difficult to predict. These data are important for realistic counselling of families with newborns with spina and planning long term rehabilitation resources.",
    keywords = "Children, Outcome, Spina bifida",
    author = "Ong, {Lai Choo} and Lim, {Y. N.} and A. Sofiah",
    year = "2002",
    month = "1",
    language = "English",
    volume = "43",
    pages = "12--17",
    journal = "Singapore Medical Journal",
    issn = "0037-5675",
    publisher = "Singapore Medical Association",
    number = "1",

    }

    TY - JOUR

    T1 - Malaysian children with spina bifida

    T2 - Relationship between functional outcome and level of lesion

    AU - Ong, Lai Choo

    AU - Lim, Y. N.

    AU - Sofiah, A.

    PY - 2002/1

    Y1 - 2002/1

    N2 - Purpose: To determine the relationship between spinal lesion level and functional outcome in children with spina bifida. Methods: Prospective observational study of 66 children who attended the Spina Bifida Clinic from 1994-1997. Data were obtained from serial physical examination and parent interview to determine mobility status, neurosensory deficits, continence and school placement. Results: Eighteen (27.3%) had high-level (thoracic and thoracolumbar), 27 (40.9%) intermediate (low lumbar) and 21 (31.8%) low-level (sacral) lesions. Children with high-level lesions experienced more mobility problems (independent ambulation, balance and use of appliances), than those with intermediate or low-level lesions (p<0.001). 58.8% of children with low-level lesions used diapers, compared with those with high (90%) or intermediate (100%) level lesions (p = 0.005), but there were no significant differences in the incidence of soiling or urinary incontinence among all three groups. There were no significant differences among the three groups in terms of school placement, skin breakdown, epilepsy or visual defect. Conclusion: Although there is good correlation between the level of the lesion and mobility in children with spina bifida, other measures of functional outcome like continence and school placement are more difficult to predict. These data are important for realistic counselling of families with newborns with spina and planning long term rehabilitation resources.

    AB - Purpose: To determine the relationship between spinal lesion level and functional outcome in children with spina bifida. Methods: Prospective observational study of 66 children who attended the Spina Bifida Clinic from 1994-1997. Data were obtained from serial physical examination and parent interview to determine mobility status, neurosensory deficits, continence and school placement. Results: Eighteen (27.3%) had high-level (thoracic and thoracolumbar), 27 (40.9%) intermediate (low lumbar) and 21 (31.8%) low-level (sacral) lesions. Children with high-level lesions experienced more mobility problems (independent ambulation, balance and use of appliances), than those with intermediate or low-level lesions (p<0.001). 58.8% of children with low-level lesions used diapers, compared with those with high (90%) or intermediate (100%) level lesions (p = 0.005), but there were no significant differences in the incidence of soiling or urinary incontinence among all three groups. There were no significant differences among the three groups in terms of school placement, skin breakdown, epilepsy or visual defect. Conclusion: Although there is good correlation between the level of the lesion and mobility in children with spina bifida, other measures of functional outcome like continence and school placement are more difficult to predict. These data are important for realistic counselling of families with newborns with spina and planning long term rehabilitation resources.

    KW - Children

    KW - Outcome

    KW - Spina bifida

    UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=0039486530&partnerID=8YFLogxK

    UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=0039486530&partnerID=8YFLogxK

    M3 - Article

    VL - 43

    SP - 12

    EP - 17

    JO - Singapore Medical Journal

    JF - Singapore Medical Journal

    SN - 0037-5675

    IS - 1

    ER -